Academic Standards Class of 2022

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Academic Programs 

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a special mission college of the Massachusetts state university system offering curricula leading to seven degrees accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Bachelor of Science degrees are awarded in Marine Transportation; Marine Engineering; Facilities Engineering; Marine Science, Safety and Environmental Protection; Emergency Management, International Maritime Business; and Energy Systems Engineering.

Academic Information

The Academy’s curricula are continually evolving in response to changes in the industries served by its programs. The Academy works to provide an exceptionally high level of academic support for an excellent instructional program. Course requirements and offerings are routinely evaluated and revised by departmental committees, the Curriculum Committee, and the All-University Committee. The following information incorporates changes made through the 2017-2018 academic year and introduced for academic year 2018-2019. Federally mandated Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) may require curriculum changes which are not yet reflected in this handbook but which may affect students entering or returning to the Academy for the fall term.

General Academic Program Information

Incoming students must declare a major as part of the admissions process. To the greatest extent possible, the selection of an academic program is voluntary; however, when necessary, students are assigned to a specific curriculum based on academic performance. Throughout their course of study at the Academy, students are required to follow the degree program curriculum sequencing in place for the year they enter the Academy. The sequencing appears in the curriculum pages below in this document.

The academic year consists of two academic semesters of approximately fifteen weeks each and an intersession period during which qualified students are expected to complete one or more of the following: sea term, cooperative education placements, experiential learning opportunities, or courses through continuing education.

The academic program is contained within a five-day week, exclusive of holidays, with eight, fifty-minute classroom periods each day from 0800 to 1550.  Laboratory sessions cover two or more periods, and some lectures extend for one and one-half periods.  Semester hour credits (also called “academic credits”) are assigned to each course.  In accordance with federal guide-lines, Massachusetts Maritime Academy defines the credit hour for a class as one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and two hours of out-of-class student work per week over a semester.  A credit hour for laboratories is two hours of lab time and two hours of out-of-class student work per week over a semester. In general, one classroom contact hour or two laboratory hours comprise one semester hour credit.

Normally, each student is enrolled in five or six academic courses (15 to 18 credits) per semester.  However, a student can retain full-time status by maintaining a minimum course load of twelve credit hours each academic semester. To carry a semester course load in excess of 19.5 credits, a student must first consult his or her academic advisor and then obtain permission from the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or his designee.

The curriculum for each major is designed to be completed in a systematic and sequential manner.  Each semester, students are expected to enroll in courses appropriate to their academic standing and class designation. Students who do not successfully complete all of the courses designated for the appropriate semesters in the curriculum for their major must understand that such failure may affect their class designation, their expected date of graduation, and their eligibility for financial aid.

Majors

The Academy currently offers students seven academic majors, which lead to the Bachelor of Science Degree: Marine Transportation; Marine Engineering; Facilities Engineering; Energy Systems Engineering; Marine Science, Safety, and Environmental Protection; International Maritime Business; and Emergency Management.

Marine Transportation
This major prepares students for careers as licensed ship officers in the United States Merchant Marine and to transfer easily into management and operations positions within the transportation, intermodal, and petroleum industries. Marine Transportation majors receive a professional education that includes extensive theoretical and practical instruction in navigation, seamanship, ship construction, and damage control. Students train on ship simulators and sail in Academy training vessels. In the junior year, students have the opportunity to sail with a commercial company, an experience that provides an excellent chance to learn the industry first-hand and establish professional contacts, further preparing students to enter the job market upon graduation in the following year. Each Marine Transportation student must, through examination by the United States Coast Guard, qualify as Third Mate, Steam and Motor Vessels of Unlimited Tonnage Upon Oceans, which requires satisfactory completion of the STCW 2010 Manila Amendment requirements in order to graduate. The ultimate goal of the program is to prepare students to embark on careers that enable them to achieve the level of Master Mariner.

Marine Engineering

This major prepares students for careers as licensed engineering officers in the United States Merchant Marine and for engineering positions in associated shore-side industries. Students learn about internal and external combustion engines, electricity and electronics, auxiliaries and main propulsion machinery, and the organization and operation of merchant vessel engineering plants. In addition, they study preventative maintenance, gain practical experience aboard ship—both in port and on the high seas—and work in laboratories to learn other skills in a variety of closely connected fields. In the junior year, students have the opportunity to sail with a commercial company, an experience that provides an excellent chance to learn the industry first-hand and establish professional contacts, further preparing students to enter the job market upon graduation in the following year. Each Marine Engineering student must, through examination by the United States Coast Guard, qualify as Third Assistant Engineers, Steam and Motor, Unlimited Horsepower, which requires satisfactory completion of STCW 2010 Manila Amendment requirements in order to graduate. The ultimate goal of the program is to prepare the student to eventually achieve the level of Chief Engineer.

Facilities Engineering
This major prepares students for the safe and economical operation of the variety of equipment found in industrial plants, office buildings, hospitals, power plants, and all facilities requiring heat, air conditioning, and electrical power. The program combines theoretical and applied engineering, placing special emphasis on learning in practical engineering laboratories, compliance with environmental regulations, and the resolution of environmental problems. The curriculum also includes three, six-week cooperative education experiences within industry, opportunities that provide valuable on-the-job experience and often lead to employment opportunities. In place of one cooperative, a student may, after successfully completing MT-1111 Vessel Familiarization and Basic Safety Training of the non-credit DGCE 40 hour Basic Safety Training course, choose to cruise on the Academy’s training ship to gain experience with a 15,500 SHP steam plant.

Energy Systems Engineering
This program will prepare graduates for careers in the many varied segments of the fast growing energy industry in positions that provide for the engineering planning, design, and installation of various equipment and systems required for the generation, management and distribution of electrical power. ESE major courses include advance mathematic and applied engineering courses along with specific courses that address the design of alternative and renewable energy systems.  The curriculum includes two summer ESE co-operatives. The ESE co-operative program provides the students with energy industry specific opportunities to gain first-hand industry knowledge, establish professional contacts, and develop future employment options.  Students in the ESE program will be required to take the nationwide Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam in the spring semester of their senior year.  Students in the ESE program can also take a USCG marine engineer license option.  This option will require a fifth year to accommodate marine engineering coursework and will require three additional sea terms taken during the students' sophomore through fifth year winter sessions.  During the spring semester of their fifth year, the license option students would take the USCG Third Assistant Engineer's license exam. Professional accreditation by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) has been pursued for the ESE program.

Marine Science, Safety and Environmental Protection
This major prepares students for a wide range of professional positions in the fields of environmental protection, environmental management, and marine and industrial health and safety. Students receive a multi-disciplinary, integrated education in sciences, management, law, communications, and safety as related to environmental issues. During the winter of their freshman year, students participate in a two-week experiential learning program, which familiarizes them with marine and terrestrial systems. They also complete two environmental or safety cooperative learning opportunities. Concentration sequences, elective courses, independent studies, and cooperatives learning opportunities enable students to tailor their academic program to meet individual interests and to gain valuable hands-on experience.

Emergency Management
The primary purpose of the Emergency Management program is to support and promote public safety.  The Emergency Management program prepares students with the education and skills necessary for successful careers in Emergency Management and related public safety fields. Career opportunities generated through this program include public sector positions in disaster management, law enforcement, and fire science, and for private sector positions in business continuity, health care, and risk management.  In addition to a three-week experiential learning program during the winter of the freshman year, two cooperative education opportunities are required.

International Maritime Business
This major, accredited by the International Accreditation Council for Business Education (IACBE), educates graduates in the foundations of general business, with a special focus on the maritime sector, and prepares them for rewarding careers in the fields of management, logistics, transportation, and maritime business. The program includes elements of international business, logistics and transportation. The curriculum includes courses in such marine operations areas as marine safety and cargo operations, as well as courses in economics, accounting, business, and management. It also includes a capstone seminar in international maritime business during the senior year. This major requires experiential learning and two cooperative experiences.

Energy Systems Engineering
This program prepares students for careers in the many and varied segments of the fast-growing energy industry in positions that provide for the engineering planning, design, and installation of various equipment and systems required for the generation, management and distribution of electrical power. Students study mathematics and applied engineering and take specific courses that address the design of alternative and renewable energy systems. The curriculum includes two summer ESE cooperatives, which provide students with opportunities within the energy industry to gain first-hand industry knowledge, establish professional contacts, and develop future employment options. Students in the ESE program will be required to take the nationwide Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam in the spring semester of their senior year. This computer-based examination format is overseen by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES). The Energy Systems Engineering bachelor degree program at Massachusetts Maritime Academy is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

Major Program Requirements

A major program at Massachusetts Maritime Academy includes approximately 128 credits of academic semester courses plus sea terms, cooperative education placements, and/or experiential learning opportunities. Programs of study for each of the Academy’s degree programs are shown in tables in a later section of this document. Within each program, the academic courses are designated in the categories of Major courses, General Education courses, and Support courses. Each major program includes at least two free electives. Students may choose to add more free elective courses, a concentration sequence of elective courses in the major, or a minor in an area outside of the major.

Major Courses
Approximately sixty credits in each degree program are designated as Major courses. These courses are related specifically to the degrees offered and usually offered by the department of the degree program.

General Education Courses
Certain required courses in the Humanities Department, the Social Science Department, and the Science and Mathematics Department are designated as General Education courses. Some of these courses are specified, and some are selected by the student. Additional information is included in the “General Education Requirements” section.

Support Courses
Courses that are outside of those designated as Major courses or General Education courses but required by a degree program are designated as Support courses.

Naval Science Courses
Courses presented by the Department of Naval Science are required to qualify for a commission in the U.S. Navy Reserve or as an active duty officer. Naval Science courses are designated as free elective courses.

Sea Terms and Commercial Shipping
All students attending August orientation are required to participate in a mini-cruise experience aboard the USTS Kennedy. Students in the Marine Transportation or Marine Engineering program must complete sea service, satisfying STCW and U.S. Coast Guard license criteria. Sea service is accrued by sailing on the USTS Kennedy and by sailing on commercial ships. At least three experiences will be aboard the USTS Kennedy. For students who meet the prerequisite requirements, a commercial ship experience may substitute for the junior USTS Kennedy cruise. Commercial shipping experiences must comply with USCG and MARAD requirements. Equivalent sea time calculations are in compliance with USCG program approval. Students must
complete all sea time as a prerequisite for taking the USCG license examinations.

Prerequisites for Sea Term I include successful completion of EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety, MT-1111 Vessel Familiarization and Basic Safety Training, and SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry (C- or above for Marine Engineering students).

Additionally, any student who falls below Academic Good Standing (GPA below 1.5) will be removed from Sea Term I and expected to take winter classes at MMA to strengthen his or her GPA.

Cooperative Education Placements
Depending upon the major, students completing a shore-side degree program must participate in up to three cooperative education placements. The Office of Career and Professional Services will assist students in locating and setting up cooperative education placements. Six credits are earned for each successful cooperative education placement.

Experiential Learning Opportunities
Depending upon the major, students completing a non-license degree program may be required to complete experiential learning opportunities. These opportunities introduce students to working environments related to a specific program of study. Through instruction and practice, the experiences reinforce core concepts learned within the degree major. Students earn academic credit for successfully completing experiential learning opportunities. The length of such opportunities varies. 

Civic Engagement
Civic engagement is an essential component of the academic programs and student life at the Academy. Part of the educational goal of the Academy is to expose students to ideas about civic rights and responsibilities and to encourage students to become active participants in the civic society of our state and nation. At MMA, an array of courses include components of civic learning and civic engagement. The campus also offers many opportunities for students to participate in civic activities. All cadets within the Regiment of Cadets are exposed to leadership development with an emphasis on duty, responsibility, and accountability, which prepares them to become active citizens. In addition, most students volunteer in service programs and outreach activities in the community. 

General Education Requirements

Students at Massachusetts Maritime Academy participate in the General Education curriculum in order to obtain the full benefits of a college education and the skills and knowledge for success in their future education and careers. Moving beyond the bounds of the major requirements, students are encouraged to become lifelong learners through a balanced variety of courses. These courses contain enough depth and breadth in the areas of humanities, social science, mathematics, and science to provide the student with the skills necessary to succeed in an increasingly complex world. These fields of knowledge foster the aesthetic appreciation, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, ethical analysis and evaluation, citizenship, and strong communication skills necessary for further self-development and personal inquiry. The courses which fulfill the General Education Requirements for each department are described below. As part of the General Education requirements, students must also complete the writing proficiency requirements, including the writing proficiency examination.

Humanities
The required courses in the Humanities Department build skills in reading, writing, critical thinking, and communication; aesthetic and cultural awareness; and humanistic inquiry.

In the first semester, students take a composition course that focuses on the skills necessary for logical presentation of thoughts and ideas in clear, concise language. In the second semester, students take Introduction to Literature, where they read, analyze, and interpret fiction, poetry, and drama for meaning, technique, cultural and historical context, and significance as literary art.

Students are then required to select two electives in the Humanities: a literature course (Group I) chosen from a variety of genres, historical periods, and subject matter, followed by either another literature course or a non-literature course (Group II) chosen from a broad range of offerings within the department.

  • GEHU1: HU-1111 English Composition or HU-6012 Advanced Expository Writing (with permission of the department chair)
  • GEHU2: HU-1222 Introduction to Literature
  • GEHU3: One course from Humanities Group I.
  • GEHU4: One course from either Humanities Group I or Group II.  

Humanities Group I

  • HU-5021 Literature of the Sea
  • HU-5022 Literature and Film
  • HU-5023 Irish Literature
  • HU-5024 Shakespeare Tragedies and Comedies
  • HU-5025 Short Stories
  • HU-5026 Literature and Mythology
  • HU-5027 Literature of the Supernatural
  • HU-5028 Drama
  • HU-5029 Contemporary Literature
  • HU-5030 Poetry
  • HU-5031 War Literature
  • HU-5032 American Literature I: Colonial to Civil War
  • HU-5033 American Literature II: Civil War to the Present
  • HU-5034 Writers of the American South
  • HU-5035 American Theater
  • HU-5036 Survival Literature
  • HU-5038 Moby Dick
  • HU-5039 Detective Literature
  • HU-5040 The Graphic Novel
  • HU-5041 African American Literature: Pre-Harlem Renaissance
  • HU-5042 African American Literature Through the Blues
  • HU-5043 African American Literature: Post-Harlem Renaissance
  • HU-5044 Post-Humanism Literature
  • HU-5055 Irish Fiction
  • HU-5056 Sports Literatures
  • HU-5090 Special Topics: Humanities Group I  

Humanities Group II

  • HU-2141 Spanish I
  • HU-2242 Spanish II
  • HU-2341 Elementary Chinese I
  • HU-2342 Elementary Chinese II
  • HU-6012 Advanced Expository Writing
  • HU-6051 Philosophy
  • HU-6054 Ethics
  • HU-6055 Introduction to World Religions
  • HU-6057 Composing in New Media
  • HU-6060 Creative Writing: Poetry
  • HU-6061 Creative Writing: Fiction 
  • HU-6063 Introduction to Women's/Gender Studies
  • HU-6064 Women and Film
  • HU-6065 Creative Writing: Nonfiction
  • HU-6071 Public Speaking
  • HU-6072 Business Communications
  • HU-6073 Technical Writing
  • HU-6080 Introduction to Art
  • HU-6090 Special Topics: Humanities Group II 

Social Sciences  
The courses from the Social Science Department strive to make students aware of the richness of their civilization and society and to prepare them to think critically about their world. They also strengthen their skills in written and oral expression. Students first study the social, intellectual, political, and economic history of the modern era in Western Civilization and then explore the nature of American political culture in American Government.

After taking two courses as a base, students take three additional courses from the Social Science Department. They will take one course in each of three groupings, which will further broaden their critical thinking and writing skills.

The underlying principles of our economic system, the dynamics of capitalism, and the fundamentals of the international economy are studied in Group I courses, where the students choose either Microeconomics or Macroeconomics.

To acquire a clear understanding of the legal regulations and legal dynamics of the fields they are entering, students take one course from Group II.

Finally, to develop a well-rounded education, students select one additional course from the Social Science Department’s Group III electives, which provide a wide range of offerings in history, geography, sociology, psychology, anthropology, behavioral science, economics and economic policy, and military affairs.

  • GESS-1: SS-1211 Western Civilization
  • GESS-2: SS-2121 American Government
  • GESS-3: One course from Social Sciences Group I
  • GESS-4: One course from Social Sciences Group II
  • GESS-5: One course from Social Sciences Group III 

GESS-3 Social Sciences Group I

  • SS-2131 Microeconomics
  • SS-2231 Macroeconomics

GESS-4 Social Sciences Group II

  • MS-3142 Environmental Law
  • SS-3221 Business Law
  • SS-3222 Real Estate Law
  • SS-3223 European Union Law
  • SS-3224 International Business Law
  • SS-3225 Admiralty & Maritime Law
  • SS-4122 International Law
  • SS-4123 International Law & Legislative Compliance
  • SS-4132 Legal Issues in Emergency Management

GESS-5 Social Sciences Group III

  • SS-2232 World Economic Geography
  • SS-2233 Political Geography
  • SS-3141 Introduction to Psychology
  • SS-3211 American Maritime History
  • SS-3212 U.S. Foreign Policy since 1945
  • SS-3213 Sea Power in World History
  • SS-3214 Europe in the Middle Ages
  • SS-3216 Ancient History Seminar
  • SS-3217 Vietnam and U.S. Policy
  • SS-3218 Civil War and Reconstruction
  • SS-3219 American History I: Origins to 1865
  • SS-3220 American History II: 1865 to Present
  • SS-3233 Chinese Economy
  • SS-3241 Sociology
  • SS-3242 Ancient Greece
  • SS-3243 Ancient Rome
  • SS-3246 U.S. Energy Policy: Both Global and Domestic
  • SS-3247 Modern Irish History
  • SS-3248 New England History
  • SS-4311 20th Century History
  • SS-4317 Intelligence and National Security Policy

Science and Mathematics
The required courses from the Science and Mathematics Department enhance the ability to think quantitatively, critically, and logically, and they illustrate the manner in which problems of a quantitative nature are solved through the use of algorithms and logical thought.

Students study fundamental mathematical functions in Algebra and Trigonometry and explore the basic concepts of analysis in either Calculus I or Applied Calculus, depending on their major. Then students take one additional mathematics course with a Calculus I or Applied Calculus prerequisite. Thus, students learn to use mathematics, including calculus, in problem solving; to use technology appropriately in this process; and to apply mathematics to problems arising in other disciplines.

In the required science courses, students apply the scientific method in a variety of classroom and laboratory settings. In so doing, they develop the ability to carefully collect, organize, and analyze data for the purpose of synthesizing a model for better understanding or problem solving.

Basic concepts of matter are explored in Chemistry I to increase students’ understanding of technology, health, and environmental issues.

Students study the laws of nature in College Physics I or Engineering Physics I in order to develop a method of reasoning that will enable them to interpret physical events in a rational manner.

To add necessary depth to their study of natural science, students also select a sequential laboratory science course in either chemistry or physics.

  • GESM-1: SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry
  • GESM-2: SM-1131 Chemistry I
  • GESM-3: SM-1212 Calculus I or SM-1214 Applied Calculus 
  • GESM-4: One course from Science and Mathematics Group I.
  • GESM-5: One course from Science and Mathematics Group II.
  • GESM-6: One course from Science and Mathematics Group III.  

Science and Mathematics Group I

  • SM-2113 Calculus II
  • SM-2115 Applied Environmental Mathematics
  • SM-2117 Quantitative Methods for Management
  • SM-2119 Applied Mathematics for Deck Officers

Science and Mathematics Group II

  • SM-2121 College Physics I
  • SM-2123 Engineering Physics I

Science and Mathematics Group III

  • SM-1232 Chemistry II
  • SM-2222 College Physics II
  • SM-2224 Engineering Physics II
  • SM-2233 Organic/Hazardous Materials Chemistry

 

Minors

A minor is a program of study of at least 18 credits outside the student’s major that typically begins in the junior year with courses taken between semesters five through eight. With departmental permission, students with a 2.5 or higher cumulative grade point average (CGPA) may declare a minor. To declare a minor prior to the junior year, a student must also have completed either Calculus I or Applied Calculus.

Note: Courses required for the minor must be taken at the Academy.

The following minors are currently offered at Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

Energy Management
The Energy Management Minor (Coordinator: Dr. Matthew Frain) prepares students for careers ashore and/or for advanced studies in energy management, alternative and renewable energy, and power generation fields in the operation of large, complex facilities. The minor is offered to students enrolled in either the Marine Engineering or Facilities Engineering major. Required courses are SM-2218 Statistics or SM-3005 Probability and Statistics, EN-3801 Energy Strategy and Management, EN-3802 Energy Systems, and a choice of three courses from a selected group of electives.

Facilities Operation
The Facilities Operation Minor (Coordinator: Professor Carlos Montanez) prepares students for careers ashore and/or for advanced studies in facilities management, stationary engineering (power generation), or wastewater treatment technology, as they relate to the operation of large, complex facilities. The minor is offered to students enrolled in either the Marine Engineering or Energy Systems Engineering major. Required courses are EN-2222 Commercial Boilers, EN-3213 Refrigeration (ESEN), EN-3214 Municipal Wastewater Treatment, EN-4222 HVAC (MENG), and a choice of three courses from a selected group of electives.

Homeland Security
The Homeland Security Minor (Coordinator: Professor George Cadwalader) is offered to students in all majors. The minor is intended to provide students with a broad understanding of the international and domestic security issues involved in homeland security. Courses provide a focus on various professions and levels of government involved in homeland security and on related topic areas. Emergency Management students are required to complete any six of the following course offerings. Students in other majors are required to complete EM-2213 National Security in Emergency Management, EM-4226 Transportation Security, and EM-3214 International Terrorism in addition to any three of the following course offerings: EM-3214 International Terrorism, EM-4112 Fire Dynamics, EM-7220 Cyber Security, EM-7221 Military Operations and Security, EM-7222 Legal Issues in Homeland and National Security, EM-7223 Select Issues in Law Enforcement, EM-7224 Transnational Crime, SS-2232 World Economic Geography, SS-2233 Political Geography, SS-4317 Intelligence and National Security Policy.

International Maritime Business
The International Maritime Business Minor (Coordinator: Dr. Paul Szwed) is intended for seagoing majors who plan to start a shore-based career, for those interested in a graduate degree in business or law, or for those inclined towards entrepreneurial ventures, the IMB minor provides a basic business background with specialization in the shipping industry. Required courses are IM-2121 Principles of Accounting I and IM-2211 The Business of Shipping, and students must also take four courses from the following: IM-XXXX (any course with an IM designation as long as prerequisites are met), MT-3252 Port and Terminal Operations Management, SM-2117 Quantitative Methods for Management.

Marine Biology
The Marine Biology Minor (Coordinator:  Professor Francis Veale, Jr.) requires students to complete six of the following seven courses: MS-4305 Principles of Aquaculture, MS-4321 Biology of Fishes, MS-4322 Marine Botany, MS-4329 Marine Mammals, MS-4333 Marine Invertebrate Zoology, MS-4334 Tropical Marine Ecology, MS-4342 Marine Microbiology.

Marine Construction
The Marine Construction Minor (Coordinator: Dr. Farzam Maleki) prepares students for careers or advanced studies in the fields of marine construction or construction project management as these fields relate to large and complex construction projects in the shore-side or marine environment. The minor is offered to students in any engineering major. Required courses are EN-7247 Construction Methods & Materials, EN-7252 Construction Project Management, EN-7257 Marine Construction I, EN-7262 Marine Construction II, and either a choice of two courses from a selected group of electives or a construction industry cooperative.

Marine Science, Safety and Environmental Protection
The Marine Science, Safety and Environmental Protection Minor (Coordinator: Professor Francis Veale, Jr.) requires that students complete each of the following six courses: MS-1111 Fundamentals of Occupational Health & Safety, MS-1211 Current Environmental Problems, MS-3142 Environmental Law, MS-4263 Oil Spill Management, MS-4271 Advanced Principles of Occupational Health & Safety, MS-4341 Ecological Sustainability.

Occupational Health & Safety
The Occupational Health & Safety Minor (Coordinator: Professor Francis Veale, Jr.) requires students to complete each of the following six courses: MS-4271 Advanced Principles of Occupational Health and Safety, MS-4272 Environmental Health and Safety Audit Program, EM-2111 Infectious Agents, EM-3212 Toxicology, EM-3213 Public Health Issues in Emergency Management, SM-3111 Introduction to Radiological Materials

Undergraduate Concentrations

With departmental permission, students with a minimum CGPA of 2.5 may enroll in a concentration of study. A concentration is a program of study with at least 12 credits within the student’s major field but not prescribed in the major program. These courses are typically taken during semesters five through eight.

Note: Concentration courses must be taken at the Academy.

The following concentrations are currently offered at Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

Homeland Security
The Homeland Security Concentration (Coordinator: Professor George Cadwalader) gives Emergency Management students the opportunity to use their four free electives for specialized study of homeland security. Required course are EM-3214 International Terrorism, EM-7220 Cyber Security, and two of the following electives: EM-4112 Fire Dynamics, EM-7221 Military Operations and Security, EM-7222 Legal Issues in Homeland and National Security, EM-7223 Select Issues in Law Enforcement, EM-7224 Transnational Crime, SS-2232 World Economic Geography, SS-2233 Political Geography, SS-4317 Intelligence and National Security Policy.

Marine Biology
The Marine Biology Concentration (Coordinator: Professor Francis Veale, Jr.) elective sequence options are provided to give students enrolled in the Marine Science, Safety and Environmental Protection major a series of electives focused on particular aspects of the field of marine biology. These normally begin in the first semester of the junior year and replace the regularly scheduled free and departmental electives, and include the following: MS-4305 Principles of Aquaculture, MS-4321 Biology of Fishes, MS-4322 Marine Botany, MS-4333 Marine Invertebrate Zoology.

Massachusetts Teacher
The Massachusetts Teacher Concentration (Coordinator: Dr. Heather Burton) is designed to help prepare students who are considering a career in secondary education. Students must complete two courses in history, science, mathematics, or humanities. The two courses taken can satisfy the two free electives and must be in addition to any core or support course requirement for the degree. The concentration also includes the completion of a six-credit classroom observation internship at a secondary education institution. The coursework and classroom observation internship total a minimum of 12 credits. This concentration is available to juniors and seniors in any major. Students should contact the coordinator for a list of courses that satisfy the concentration requirements.

Dual Degrees

Students with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 may enroll in a dual-degree program with the permission of the department chairperson of each program. Interested students may pursue dual-degree combinations by presenting their proposals for approval by the chairperson of each department.  In order to officially declare a dual major before the end of the third semester, a student must have completed either Calculus I or Applied Calculus.

4+1 Program

The 4+1 program is aimed at the eligible, high-achieving cadet who is prepared to launch his or her graduate education in the senior year of undergraduate studies. Motivated students from any of the seven MMA undergraduate degree programs can apply to any of the three MMA graduate degree programs in the spring semester of the junior year. Accepted students would begin taking master’s-level classes in the fall semester of the senior year alongside their graduate classmates, a student body comprising working professionals, at the Conference Center at Waltham Woods in Waltham, MA.

4+1 students complete five of their master’s classes during their senior year. Optimally, these students will have found a job upon graduating from their undergraduate program and will complete the remaining master’s-level courses during their first year of employment. Such employment is not required but is strongly encouraged.

The first three semesters of the 4+1 program will be offered at a highly discounted rate to accepted undergraduate students. In addition, an accepted student may use two of the five graduate classes taken in the first three semesters to fulfill undergraduate electives, assisting students with time management while dual-enrolled.

Note: Students cannot reside on campus following graduation from an undergraduate degree program, but hotel lodging is provided in Waltham on graduate class weekends.

4+1 Degree Programs
Each of the three Master’s Degrees offers a specialized management curriculum.

Emergency Management
The graduate program in Emergency Management comprises 34 credits. Its mission is to provide graduates with the knowledge, skills and tools necessary to implement both proactive and reactive strategies to reduce the cost of a disaster in life and property and thus to be successful emergency managers and leaders in both the public and private sectors.

Facilities Management
The graduate program in Facilities Management comprises 31 credits. Its mission is to challenge students to think and act on a broader and higher plane. These skills should directly help them to succeed in their personal and professional careers.

Maritime Business Management
The graduate program in Maritime Business Management comprises 31 credits. Its mission is to produce highly skilled maritime business managers by providing students with the knowledge and tools necessary to become creative problem solvers, leading to success in senior maritime business management and leadership positions.

4 + 1 Admissions Criteria
Students interested in the 4+1 program must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and submit the following to apply:

  1. a complete online application;
  2. two recommendations;
  3. a written statement of professional objectives that includes both long- and short-term professional goals and indicates how the graduate program will help the student achieve these goals;
  4. a current résumé.

For more information on the 4+1 and the individual graduate program options, please contact Graduate Programs at 508-830-5096, via e-mail at graduate@maritime.edu, or by visiting the web site at www.maritime.edu/graduate-studies.

Military Commissioning Opportunities

In recent years, MMA students have been commissioned upon graduation as officers in the National Guard, the U.S. Army, the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Marine Corps, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Navy Reserve.

Navy Strategic Sealift Midshipman Program (SSMP)
The Department of Naval Science administers the Strategic Sealift Midshipman Program (SSMP).

The Strategic Sealift Midshipman Program (SSMP) is a unique type of NROTC Unit that is only offered at the seven maritime schools, and it differs in several key ways. Upon graduation, the SSMP allows students earning a Coast Guard License to be directly commissioned as officers into the Strategic Sealift Officer Program (SSOP), a specialized component of the Navy Reserve. Formerly known as the Merchant Marine Reserve, the SSOP is a cadre of naval officers who are licensed merchant mariners with sealift, maritime operations, and logistics subject matter expertise. The SSOP is called upon to provide integrated sealift operations in support of National Defense.

SSMP Midshipmen who commission into the Navy Reserve will have an eight-year military service obligation. The program also offers a limited number of opportunities to pursue an Active Duty commission. This limited number of billets is based upon the current needs of the Navy and is not guaranteed. If selected for active duty, an individual incurs a military obligation that is dependent upon the community.

Once commissioned into the Navy Reserve, Strategic Sealift Officer Program Officers serve in an Active Reserve status as either Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) or Selected Reserve (SELRES), with the majority of members falling under the Individual Ready Reserve. Strategic Sealift Officers are reservists who serve on periods of active duty to support both afloat and shore-side military and reserve fleet operations that call for the training and experience of Merchant Marine Officers. While most members of the SSOP work in the maritime industry in their civilian careers, doing so is not a requirement of the program.

U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)
Army ROTC is a mentally and physically challenging opportunity available to cadets who are interested in serving their country as officers in the nation’s most senior service, who are ready to achieve an unparalleled level of confidence and excellence as leaders, and who are committed to scholarship and physical fitness. The program includes weekly classes in leadership, customs and traditions, and other subjects, and it incorporates hands-on, practical training. Cadets in the program undergo physical training twice each week and field training exercises once each semester. They also participate in various social events, benefit from affiliation with prestige organizations, and have the opportunity to attend, as cadets, such elite schools as Airborne and Air Assault. Freshmen attend ROTC classes at the Academy, while sophomores, juniors, and seniors attend classes at nearby Stonehill College.

Massachusetts Maritime Academy Undergraduate Curricula

Download PDF of B.S. Marine Transportation Curriculum
Download PDF of B.S. Marine Engineering Curriculum
Download PDF of B.S. Facilities Engineering Curriculum
Download PDF of B.S. Marine Science, Safety and Environmental Protection Curriculum
Download PDF of B.S. Emergency Managmenet Curriculum
Download PDF of B.S. International Maritime Business Curriculum
Download PDF of B.S. Energy Systems Engineering Curriculum

Degree Program Eligibility and Progress

Marine Transportation Eligibility
To enroll in Marine Transportation, a student must pass both MT-1111 Vessel Familiarization and Basic Safety Training and EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety with a grade of C- or better.

A student who fails twice to receive a grade of C- or better in MT-1221 Coastal Navigation or in MT-2121 Deep Sea Navigation will be disenrolled from the Marine Transportation degree program.

A student failing to meet any of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible.

Marine Engineering Eligibility
Because quantitative reasoning is essential to successfully advance in the engineering programs, all engineering students must pass SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry with a grade of C- or better to advance to SM-1212 Calculus I.

To enroll in Marine Engineering, a student must pass both MT-1111 Vessel Familiarization and Basic Safety Training and EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety with a grade of C- or better and must also pass SM-1111 Algebra & Trigonometry with a grade of C- or better by the second attempt.

Once enrolled in the major, a student must complete SM-1212 Calculus I by the second attempt with a grade of C- or better.

To remain enrolled in the major, a student must complete EN-2211 Mechanics by the third attempt.

A student failing to meet any of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible.

Facilities Engineering Eligibility
Because quantitative reasoning is essential to successfully advance in the engineering programs, all engineering students must pass SM- 1111 Algebra and Trigonometry with a grade of C- or better to advance to SM-1212 Calculus I.

To enroll in Facilities Engineering, a student must pass EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety with a grade of C- or better and must also pass SM-1111 Algebra & Trigonometry with a grade of C- or better by the second attempt.

Once enrolled in the major, a student must complete SM-1212 Calculus I by the second attempt with a grade of C- or better.

To remain enrolled in the major, a student must complete EN-2211 Mechanics by the third attempt.

A student failing to meet any of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible.

Energy Systems Engineering Eligibility
Because quantitative reasoning is essential to successfully advance in the engineering programs, all engineering students must pass SM- 1111 Algebra and Trigonometry with a grade of C- or better to advance to SM-1212 Calculus I.

To enroll in Energy Systems Engineering, a student must pass EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety with a grade of C- or better.

Once enrolled in the major, a student must complete SM-1212 Calculus I by the end of the second semester with a grade of C- or better.

To remain enrolled in the major, a student must achieve a grade of C- or better in EN-2101 Engineering Statics on the first attempt.

A student failing to meet any of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible. 

Course Prerequisites and Corequisites

A grade issued as an incomplete, that two weeks into the semester turns into an F, does not satisfy prerequisite requirements.

All STCW courses must be completed with a C- or better grade in order to be considered completed for STCW requirements. A full list of STCW courses can be found on pages in the STCW section of this document.

Download a PDF of prerequisites and corequisites for courses offered as of 1 September 2017.  This list may change during your four years at Massachusetts Maritime Academy.  The Course Catalog published each year will contain any changes.

Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW)

Download a PDF of the STCW Quality Standard Memo

The international convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) is an international treaty that established minimum curriculum standards and performance measures for maritime training programs. Certain courses, as noted in the previous chapter, are designated as containing STCW knowledge or practical elements. All students, regardless of major, must earn a grade of C- or better to pass any course containing STCW knowledge components and must successfully complete all practical demonstrations in any course containing STCW practical elements. Any STCW course serving as a prerequisite for another course must be passed with a grade of C- or better to satisfy the prerequisite. In addition, students majoring in Marine Engineering or Marine Transportation must complete all requirements for issuance of the appropriate U. S. Coast Guard merchant marine officer’s license

Download a PDF list of STCW Courses

Engineering Department STCW Grading Policy
Existing STCW policy requires a passing grade of 70 or higher for any required STCW course. An STCW grade below 70 results in the requirement to repeat the applicable STCW course. To establish a clear Engineering Department policy and to make clear student expectations, the Engineering Department has established a no “D” grading policy for any STCW course taught by the Engineering Department.  Therefore, the Engineering Department STCW course grading policy is: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, and F. The following required STCW courses are taught by the Engineering Department and fall under this policy:

EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety
EN-1211 Auxiliary Machinery I
EN-1222 Auxiliary Machinery I for Facilities
EN-2111 Auxiliary Machinery II
EN-2121 Auxiliary Machinery II for Facilities
EN-2112 Machine Tool Technology
EN-2231 Sea Term II – Engine
EN-2232 Internal Combustion Engines I 
EN-3111 Electrical Machines
EN-3111L Electrical Machines Lab
EN-3131 Steam Generators
EN-3212 Electronics
EN-3213 Refrigeration
EN-3216 Operational Controls
EN-3233 Steam and Gas Turbines
EN-4112 Thermodynamics/Fluids Lab
EN-4131 Internal Combustion Engines II
EN-4151 Applied Naval Architecture for Marine Engineers
EN-4231 Sea Term IV – Engine
EN-4234 Engine Room Resource Management

Academic Standards

Grades
Letter grades are assigned to students according to the following scale for each academic course:

Alphabetical Grade 4.0 Equivalent Alphabetical Grade 4.0 Equivalent
A 4.00 D+ 1.33
A- 3.67 D 1.00
B+ 3.33 D- .67
B 3.00 F 0.00
B- 2.67 P(Pass)  
C+ 2.33 I (Incomplete) ---
C 2.00 X (Exempt) ---
C- 1.67 W (Withdrawn) ---

A single, alphabetical grade certified by the instructor within the deadline published on the academic calendar is assigned to each student and submitted to the Registrar.

Students questioning a grade awarded must follow the Grade Appeal Process section of this document.

Grade changes must be submitted in writing to the Registrar by the instructor within two weeks after the start of the term immediately following the term in which the grade was given. An extension of the two-week period may only be allowed upon special arrangement by the instructor with the Dean of Undergraduate Studies.

Pass-Fail
Eligibility: No course required for a major degree may be taken as a pass/fail option. Permission to take an eligible course for a pass/fail grade is granted at the sole discretion of the instructor. To request the pass/fail course option, a student must have a current academic standing of junior or senior status and a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.5. The student must submit a fully completed request form to the Registrar prior to the end of the add/drop period; otherwise, the student will be graded according to the existing Academic Grading Standards. A student may take no more than one pass-fail course in a given semester and no more than two pass-fail courses as part of his or her overall curriculum.

Grading: The student’s grade shall be calculated on the same basis as that used for all other students taking the course. The student shall receive a ‘P’ for a grade that exceeds the instructor’s established passing benchmark. The student shall receive an ‘F’ for a grade that falls below the instructor’s established passing benchmark. A passing grade of ‘P’ will not affect the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and will be excluded from any GPA calculations. However, a failing grade of ‘F’ will negatively affect the student’s CGPA by the applicable course credit being included in the calculation of the semester grade point average and the CGPA.

Incomplete
At the student’s request, an instructor may agree to award an incomplete grade (‘I’) at the end of an academic term if the student has failed to meet a course requirement due to illness or other reasons beyond his or her control.

Students are authorized a maximum of two weeks into the following semester to rectify a grade of incomplete. If the incomplete is not rectified within that period, the incomplete is automatically converted to a failure (‘F’).

An extended period to submit a final grade may be allowed by the instructor upon approval of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. The instructor shall submit a recommended grade to the Registrar within 48 hours of the extended period allowed above.

Coursework Policies

Add/Drop Period
A student may add courses, consistent with other requirements, up to six business days into the semester. A student may drop a course, consistent with other requirements, up to 15 business days into the semester.

Note: Full-time status is considered to be twelve credits or more.

Withdrawal Policy
If a student wishes to withdraw from a course after the add/drop period, he or she must obtain written acknowledgment from the instructor, the student’s academic advisor, and the Registrar. It must be understood that such withdrawal may affect the student’s date of graduation, eligibility for financial aid, and anticipated graduation date. Students may withdraw from no more than one course per semester. No student may withdraw from a course after the 10th week of classes. Students may not withdraw from a course previously failed or from SM-1111. No student may withdraw from the same course more than once. A “W” will appear on the student’s transcript.

Course Exemption
Course Exemption An exemption is awarded to a student who has been authorized by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or designee to omit taking a course. Exemptions apply only to the following:

  • through Advanced Placement examination, with a grade of 3 or better, the student has been determined to be proficient in course subject matter;
  • through transfer credit awarded for International Baccalaureate (IB) higher-level courses in which the student has earned a score of 4 or higher. Credit is not awarded for standard-level courses. All decisions regarding transfer credit for IB courses will be made by the Registrar in consultation with the appropriate department chairperson;
  • through validation of grades received at another accredited institution of higher education with a grade of ‘C’ or better;
  • through validation of certified professional licenses or transcripts of grades by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or designee;
  • through the College Level Examination Program and ATP examinations with a score at or above the national mean with the approval of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or designee.

Transfer Credits
In order for a student enrolled at the Academy to receive credit for a course taken at another institution, the following conditions must be met:

  • The transfer course must be offered at an accredited institution;
  • The catalog description of the course must be substantially similar to that of the corresponding Academy course and be of equal or greater credit hours;
  • A request for approval to take the course for transfer credit must be submitted to the appropriate department chairperson at least two weeks prior to the start of the course;
  • A student who requests a transfer course while enrolled during a semester at the Academy as a full-time student will have his or her course load reviewed specifically to determine whether the transfer course will constitute an overload or excessive load for the semester;
  • Authorization to take the course for transfer credit will be granted or denied at the discretion of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies with the advice and consent of the respective chairperson of the academic department in which the course is offered at the Academy;
  • A grade of ‘C’ or better (2.0 or higher) must be obtained in the course for it to be deemed successfully completed. The grade received for the course transferred will not be included in calculating the student’s CGPA and will not appear on the transcript;
  • An official transcript showing completion of the course must be sent to the Registrar’s office no later than six weeks after the course completion. Credit for the course will be awarded once the official transcript is received;
  • No Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) course may be taken online;

A student must be in academic good standing in accordance with MMA policy at the time of his or her request to take an online course.

VALOR Act

The Registrar or designee shall serve as the contact point for evaluation of student military occupation, training, coursework, and experience. The Registrar will evaluate the prospective student’s official transcripts, using the ACE Guide as a key reference for course descriptions and equivalencies. Courses must carry the equivalent of three or more credits for transfer, and the students must have earned the equivalent of a “C” grade (75%) or better. Accepted coursework will appear on the student’s transcript as transfer courses. As per Academy policy, only the credits will transfer, not the grades. When necessary, the Registrar will consult with the appropriate department chairperson to determine transferability. The Registrar will accept CLEP and/ or DANTES exam scores based on Academy policy and the recommended guidelines of these programs. STCW courses, whether knowledge- or practical-based, will not be replaced by military coursework, training, or experience.

Cooperative Education Credit for Military Service
With appropriate documentation, credit for one, six-credit cooperative education placement may be awarded to students who meet one of the following eligibility requirements for military service in the U.S. Armed Forces or State National Guard:

  • at least one year of full-time, active duty within the preceding five years;
  • at least one year of active reserve service within the preceding five years;
  • at least 40 days of active service in a single calendar year while enrolled as a full-time student at the Academy;
  • fulfillment of the calendar year active reserve commitment while a full-time student at the Academy.

Note: Under the MARAD approved 310 Programs, sea service accrued as part of active or reserve military service cannot be substituted for or credited as sea service toward a USCG license.

Academic Evaluation
Faculty have several tools in addition to the semester grading to measure a student’s progress towards successful completion of a course. A member of the faculty may opt to use the academic alert system and/ or mid-term deficiencies as a means of informing a student that he or she is not performing at a level necessary to pass the course. When a faculty member uses either of these tools, the information is disseminated to the student and to his or her academic advisor.

Academic Deficiency, Mid-term
A student found deficient at midterm will be notified by the Registrar of his or her deficiency. The student’s academic advisor will be notified by the Registrar at that time.

Course Failures
A student must receive a passing grade (D- or better), unless otherwise indicated in the course description, to receive credit for a course. A student who fails a course has two options:

  1. Repeat the failed course on campus. The repeated course grade and credit hours (see “Forgiveness of One” policy) will be used in calculating the term grade point average of the term in which the course is repeated. The cumulative grade point average will include the repeated grade and credit hours only;
  2. Repeat the failed course, or equivalent, at another accredited institution. A minimum grade of ‘C’ (2.00) will be required for the course to be deemed successfully completed. Transfer grades will not be used in calculating the CGPA (see “Transfer Credits” section).

“Forgiveness of One” Policy
This policy allows a student to replace a failing grade with a higher grade for the purpose of calculating the Cumulative Grade Point Average. If a student were to fail a course on multiple attempts, all but the first failure would be calculated in the student’s CGPA. Note: All grades will continue to be shown on the transcript.

Repeated Courses
A student may repeat a course previously passed (but never failed) once within one year of the original grade. The repeated course grade and credit hours will be used in calculating the term grade point average of the term in which the course is repeated. The cumulative grade point average will be calculated using the higher of the two grades and credit hours.

Grade Appeal Process
The grade appeal policy is designed to resolve a student’s specific concerns with regard to a final course grade. If such a concern exists, the student is encouraged to initiate this process, mindful that no adverse consequences will result from making an informal or formal appeal.

If a student feels that a final course grade is inappropriate, the student must make an appointment with the faculty member to discuss the matter informally. The appointment must be requested within the first two weeks of the academic semester following the semester for which the grade was given. Every effort will be made to resolve the student’s concerns informally.

If the student’s concerns are not resolved through the informal appeal policy, the student may pursue the formal appeal process by meeting with the appropriate department chairperson. The burden of proof is on the student to show that a grade is inappropriate. The formal appeal must be initiated within two weeks after the conclusion of the informal process. The formal process commences when the student submits in writing a description of the basis for the grievance, including any corroborating materials, to the department chairperson. The department chairperson will promptly notify the instructor of the formal appeal. Within two weeks of said notification, the instructor must provide the department chairperson a written response to the grade appeal. The department chairperson will then make an assessment as to the validity of the student’s grievance and provide a written copy of any recommendations to both the instructor and the student.

Whatever the recommendation of the department chairperson, it remains the sole prerogative of the instructor to change the grade given.

Exceptions to the policy time limits of both the informal and formal appeal processes may be permitted if the Dean of Undergraduate Studies determines that clear and compelling extenuating circumstances have occurred.

Class Attendance
Policies relating to attending class are published in the syllabus for each course.

Verification of Student Identity in Distance Education
To ensure compliance with the provisions of the United States Federal Higher Education Opportunity Act, Public Law 110-315, concerning the verification of student identity in distance education, the Academy has established policy for the following:

  • providing students with a secure login and password;
  • proctored examinations;
  • utilization of current technologies and practices effective in verifying student identification.

Detailed information on policy applicable to distance education is available at the MMA web site. 

Academic Honesty
Massachusetts Maritime Academy expects all cadets and students to abide by its Honor Code, which states that “Cadets and students do not lie, cheat, or steal, nor do they tolerate these acts from others. “ The Cadet Regimental Manual clearly outlines the various actions that may be considered cheating. These include plagiarism, misrepresentation, and unauthorized notes, among other things. Individual instructors may set the requirements for their courses as they wish, and students should make sure they understand these requirements. Academic freedom has traditionally allowed instructors to address academic dishonesty in many ways, including (but not limited to) requiring the student to redo an assignment, assigning a grade of zero for the test or assignment, or failing the student for the course. When the situation warrants, the instructor may also refer the matter to the Honor Board, which may recommend suspension or dismissal from the Academy for violations of the Honor Code.

Satisfactory Progress
A student is deemed to be making satisfactory progress toward a degree if the student maintains academic good standing and retains the same academic year designation for no more than three academic semesters. Students who are not making satisfactory progress toward a degree will be reviewed by the Academic Review Board. A student must complete all degree requirements, including license programs, within 10 years from the original date of enrollment. All courses, taken either at MMA or at another accredited institution, will have a 10-year time limitation except where Coast Guard regulations otherwise require. Exemptions to the 10-year limit may be considered on an individual basis when recommended by the Vice-President of Academic Affairs and President of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Factors that may result in a waiver might include time spent on humanitarian efforts or in military service.

Setback
Academic setback may be granted by the Academic Review Board when it concludes that a student otherwise subject to academic dismissal may benefit by repeating an academic semester at the Academy. A setback student will retake at least three courses for which he or she previously received grades of ‘D+’ or lower. Grades earned will replace the previous grades in the calculation of the CGPA. The student remains on academic probation during the setback semester and must bring his or her CGPA up to retention standards at the end of the semester or be dismissed from the Academy.

Eligibility: A student must have sophomore status or higher as defined by the Academic Standards to be eligible for academic setback, and a student is allowed only one setback while at the Academy

Restrictions: A student on academic setback:

  • must retake at least three courses;
  • may not take more than one course not taken previously;
  • may not take more than 13 academic credits;
  • may not hold any regimental or shipboard leadership position;
  • may not participate in Academy sponsored clubs, extracurricular activities, or varsity athletics. 

Academic Standing
The following minimum standards are established for cumulative grade point averages (CGPA):

Year Retention Good Standing
First Semester 1.0 1.5
Second Semester 1.5 1.8
Third Semester 1.5 1.8
Fourth Semester 1.8 2.0
Fifth Semester and beyond 2.0 2.0

 

Grade Point Calculation
The student academic record contains an alphabetical grade for each course, a semester hour credit for each course, and a quality point notation for each course.  The quality point is the product of the alphabetical grade 4.0 point equivalent and the semester hour grade, e.g., grade ‘B’ (3.0 points) times 3 semester hour credits = 9 quality points.

At the end of each term, the quality points for each course are added together and the sum divided by the total of all credit hours to obtain a Term Quality Point Average (TGPA).

At the end of each academic term, the Cumulative Quality Point Average (CGPA) is computed by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the student since entrance to the college by the total number of credit hours.

Academic Review Board
The Academic Review Board reviews the academic status and potential of those students subject to dismissal from the Academy. The Board is empowered to recommend mitigation to suspension or probation.  The Academic Review Board comprises the department chairpersons, the Registrar, and the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. The deliberations of the Academic Review Board are conducted in accordance with procedural rules adopted on its motion. Recommendations are submitted to the President for consideration and final disposition.  Students who fail to meet the standards for retention may be dismissed from the Academy at the discretion of the Academic Review Board.

Academic Dismissal
Academic dismissal constitutes the removal of a student from the Academy because he or she was unable to achieve minimum academic standards.  Students who are academically dismissed from the Academy may not take courses through the Academy’s standard ‘day’ program or through its Division of Graduate and Continuing Education. An academically dismissed student may apply for readmission to the Academy only after having completed at least 12 credits, approved by Massachusetts Maritime Academy and taken at other accredited institutions of higher learning, achieving a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50 at those institutions.

Any student falling in one or more of the following categories will be subject to dismissal from the Academy:

  1. having failed to meet the minimum standards established for retention;
  2. having failed three or more courses in a single term;
  3. having been unable to achieve academic good standing after being on probation for two consecutive semesters;
  4. having failed to advance to the next level of academic standing after three or more semesters.  

Academic Suspension
Academic suspension constitutes temporary removal from the college for academic deficiencies that must be rectified before readmission, as identified by the Academic Review Board. The conditions of suspension include a written notification to the student of the course(s) that must be successfully completed either at MMA, as a non-matriculated student, or at another accredited institution of higher learning before he or she can be considered for readmission to the Academy. The Dean of Undergraduate Studies will determine the grade and/or grade point average the student must achieve to be considered for readmission to MMA.

Suspension will automatically result when a student fails to complete SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry by the end of the second semester at the Academy.  In order to be considered for readmission, subject to the approval of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies, a student who fails to complete SM- 1111 Algebra and Trigonometry by the end of the second academic semester may

  1. re-take the course at MMA, as a non-matriculated student, and earn a passing grade (D- or better), or
  2. take a similar, pre-approved course at another accredited institution of higher learning and earn a grade of “C” or better.

Academic Probation
Probationary status is a warning to a student that he or she is no longer in academic good standing and is in jeopardy of falling below those standards established for retention or graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to increase his or her academic efforts in order to regain academic good standing. Probation will automatically result when

  1. a student’s CGPA falls below those numbers established for academic good standing;
  2. a student is readmitted following academic suspension or dismissal.

A student will be removed from academic probation by

  1. raising his or her CGPA to the level necessary to be in academic good standing;
  2. repeating and obtaining a passing grade in a course necessary to be in compliance with graduation requirements.

A student cannot remain on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters without being subject to dismissal from the Academy.

Dismissal from the Academy
Any student dismissed from the Academy for conduct reasons will not be allowed to enroll in MMA courses, to include courses offered through the Division of Graduate and Continuing Education.

Academic Year Designation

Students in a degree program have the academic year designation of freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior.

A sophomore has successfully completed at least one-fourth of the courses required for the degree program, including all but two required first-year courses.

A junior has successfully completed at least one-half of the courses required for the degree program, including all required first-year courses and all but two required second-year courses.

A senior has successfully completed at least three-quarters of the courses required for the degree program, including all required first-year and second-year courses and all but two required third-year courses.

Class Designation

Members of the Regiment of Cadets are designated 1/C, 2/C, 3/C, and 4/C.

4/C status: Cadet Candidates receive recognition as 4/C cadets during the fall semester of their first year of enrollment.

4/C to 3/C status: Students who have successfully completed all but two freshman requirements and have a 1.8 cumulative grade point average.

3/C to 2/C status: Students who have successfully completed all freshman requirements, have successfully completed all but two sophomore requirements, and have a 2.0 cumulative grade point average.

2/C to 1/C status: Students who have successfully completed all freshman and sophomore requirements, have successfully completed all but two junior requirements, and have a 2.0 cumulative grade point average.

4/C to 3/C status (transfer students): Students who have completed one semester at MMA, completed the two-week orientation, completed Sea Term I or experiential learning, earned at least 48 credits (including transfer and MMA credits) prior to the start of spring semester (including English Composition, Algebra and Trigonometry, and Chemistry I), and have a 1.8 cumulative grade point average.

Transfer students’ class year designation is determined on an individual basis by the Vice President for Student Services or designee, based on the anticipated graduation date.

Eligibility Criteria for the Shanghai Maritime University and Dalian Maritime University Exchange Programs

The following criteria need to be met for MMA cadets to participate in a formal exchange program between the Massachusetts Maritime Academy and Shanghai Maritime University and between the Massachusetts Maritime Academy and Dalian Maritime University. These criteria are only the minimum standards.

A formal application from those interested in participating must be submitted no later than the last day of September of the sophomore year.  The selection committee will consist of the Registrar, a representative from the Commandant of Cadets, and the Academic Department Chairperson from the applicant’s major. Committee members will select candidates who have met the following criteria and who represent the best of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy:

  1. For the SMU exchange program a student must be majoring in Marine Transportation, Marine Engineering, Facilities Engineering, International Maritime Business, or Marine Safety and Environmental Protection. The DMU exchange program is limited to International Maritime Business students only
  2. A student must achieve sophomore academic designation and 3/C Regimental status by the start of the third semester at MMA.
  3. A student must achieve junior academic designation and 2/C Regimental status by the start of the fifth semester at MMA.
  4. A student must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.
  5. A student must participate in the “Hosting” program at MMA.
  6. A student must successful complete three semesters in residence at MMA prior to hosting a student from SMU or DMU.
  7. A student must successful complete Chinese I prior to spending the semester in China.
  8. A student will receive preferred consideration after having demonstrated leadership potential through participation in extracurricular activities.
  9. A student must be able to represent the United States and the Massachusetts Maritime Academy well.
  10. A student must be in excellent standing within the Regiment of Cadets.  The cadet’s record will be clear of trends of problem behavior and and/or major offenses (Class II and above).
  11. A student must have demonstrated satisfactory effort, participation, care and judgment while serving as a host for a SMU or DMU roommate during the 3/C spring semester.
  12. MMA Cadets with “host” status but no SMU or DMU roommate will be considered on a probationary status. Cadets will need to demonstrate the ability to care for an exchange student at the Academy as the cadet would like to be treated while at SMU or DMU.

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Cadets fortunate enough to be selected will also be held to the highest standards of behavior while studying abroad.  Cadets will be charged appropriately for conduct unbecoming of MMA cadets while abroad.  Those charges will be adjudicated by MMA according to the recommended processing times listed in the regimental manual.

Writing Program Eligibility & Standards

At the end of Introduction to Literature (HU-1222), students will take the Writing Proficiency Examination (WPE). Transfer students, students with English Literature AP credit, and students who have taken Introduction to Literature (or its equivalent) elsewhere should check with their advisors or the Humanities Department Chairperson regarding testing. All students must take and pass the WPE in order to graduate. Students who do not pass the WPE are required to take HU-6062 Writing in Style and must earn a C- or better in order to pass the course and satisfy the WPE requirement. 

Awards and Honors

At the end of each academic term, full-time student grades are reviewed. For students with no incompletes or grades below C-, term grade point averages are calculated and academic proficiency is noted as follows:

President’s List             3.6 or higher
Dean’s List                   3.3–3.59

A cadet who appears on the Dean’s List or the President’s List is entitled to wear the appropriate device on his or her uniform. All ribbons will be awarded by the Vice-President of Academic Affairs or designee at the appropriate time.

Graduation Standards

Graduation Honors Academic excellence for the baccalaureate program is recognized by awarding degrees summa cum laude (CGPA of 3.8 or higher), magna cum laude (CGPA of 3.6 to 3.79), and cum laude (CGPA of 3.3 to 3.59). The CGPA determined for honors is based on all college-level work attempted at Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Students who received three or more ‘F’ grades at MMA are not eligible for graduation honors.

The commencement booklet is printed prior to grades being submitted for the last term. Therefore, the Office of the Registrar must print the honors designation that a student has earned up to but not including his or her final semester. The student’s official degree transcript will reflect the appropriate honors designation.

Graduation
To receive a Bachelor of Science degree, a student must

1. be recommended for the degree by the appropriate department in recognition of satisfactory completion of the minimum number of courses and credits as established in the degree curriculum;
2. maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 as well as a grade point average of 2.0 in the major;
3. have not failed, without repeating successfully, any courses in the required curriculum (only failures in courses not required to complete the degree are allowed);
4. maintain prescribed standards of conduct and aptitude;
5. discharge all financial obligations to the Academy;
6. successfully complete applicable U.S. Coast Guard license examinations prior to the awarding of a degree in Marine Engineering or Marine Transportation, as required by the Maritime Administration (MARAD).

Rule of One
The graduation “Rule of One” Policy is as follows: The Massachusetts Maritime Academy graduation policy permits students who are delinquent in not more than one course or one Sea Term to participate in the June graduation exercises.

Residency Requirements

Residency requirements for students earning their first baccalaureate degree at the Academy are as follows:

  1. Students must complete at least 40 credit hours in residence at the Academy;
  2. At least half of courses required in the major must be in residence;
  3. At least half of all courses required in any minor or concentration must be in residence;
  4. At least 30 of the last 40 credit hours earned must be in residence (i.e., “final year” requirement).

Residency requirements for students earning their second baccalaureate degree at the Academy are as follows:

  1. Students must complete at least 40 credit hours in residence at the Academy;
  2. At least half of courses required in the major must be in residence;
  3. At least half of all courses required in any minor or concentration must be in residence.

Residence credit includes the following:

  • fall and spring term courses offered for credit through the Academy (including hybrid courses);
  • winter and summer intersession courses offered for credit through the Division of Graduate and continuing Education;
  • foreign study credit earned through Academy-sponsored programs.

Residence credit does not include the following:

  • transfer credit (including any foreign study credit through programs not sponsored by the Academy);
  • international baccalaureate credit;
  • course exemptions awarded for Advanced Placement (AP coursework, ATP examinations, the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), and the DSST Program;
  • credit from courses offered exclusively online.

Note that exceptions to the “final year” residency requirement may be granted at the discretion of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Exceptions, for instance, may be granted for active-duty service members, including Reservists and National Guardsmen. Students are still expected, however, to meet the minimum credit residency requirements for the degree.

Transfer credit applied towards a USCG licensed major will only be accepted from another United States maritime academy. Licensed majors must also complete sea time and STCW assessments in entirety to satisfy USCG requirements, which may result in additional coursework.

For students who earned their first baccalaureate degree from the Academy and return for a second baccalaureate degree, cumulative credits and cumulative GPA will be continued from the prior degree, and the same transcript will be used.

Academic Assessment

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is committed to maintaining academic excellence and continuously improving the quality of our academic programs. Through assessment of core competencies and institutional student learning outcomes, the Academy assesses and monitors the effectiveness of instruction and learning to identify academic weaknesses and areas for improvement. All faculty and students participate in a variety of individual and program assessments to meet these objectives. Students are assessed in five Core Competencies, which represent essential skills and abilities that form the educational foundation for all other courses and allow for success beyond the Academy. These competencies are introduced, reinforced by, or incorporated into many courses throughout the curriculum. All students who graduate from MMA should achieve competency in these areas. The five core competencies are as follows:

Specialized Knowledge: This competency reflects what students should be able to demonstrate with respect to their major or academic program;

Broad and Integrative Learning: This competency reflects basic knowledge and understanding related to humanities, social sciences, sciences, and mathematics. It also reflects students’ ability to bridge different areas of learning;

Intellectual Skills: This competency reflects students’ skills as related to communication, quantitative literacy, and higher-order thinking. It also includes technology and information literacy skills, creating a foundation for lifelong learning;

Applied and Collaborative Learning: This competency reflects what students can do with what they know. It reflects students’ application of knowledge, skills, classroom, workplace, and other settings;

Civic and Global Learning: This competency reflects the knowledge, skills, values, and abilities necessary for participation in civic and democratic life. It includes awareness, understanding, and appreciation of social and political values as well as respect for diversity and inclusion.

Learning Outcomes
Consistent with its mission of providing each undergraduate student with educational experiences employing both conventional classroom instruction and practical, hands-on experience in state-of-the-art simulators, aboard a seagoing training vessel, aboard commercial ships, in shore-side laboratories, in the workplace, and during experiential learning, Massachusetts Maritime Academy has established institutional student learning outcomes that are derived from the Academy’s core competencies and address expectations for the undergraduate experience within the majors, the general education program, and the co-curriculum. The institutional learning outcomes are as follows:

Specialized Knowledge

  • Basic knowledge and understanding of the history, theories, scholarship, tools, technologies, methods, and/or specialized terms of a field of study;

Broad and Integrative Learning

  • Basic knowledge and understanding of humanities, social sciences, sciences, and mathematics;
  • Ability to explore concepts and questions that bridge different areas of learning;

Intellectual Skills

  • Ability to write, read, speak, and listen effectively;
  • Ability to critically and creatively comprehend and evaluate new information and ideas;
  • Ability to use quantitative reasoning skills, applying basic concepts of mathematics and science;
  • Capacity for lifelong learning, including the ability to utilize technology and information literacy;

Applied and Collaborative Learning

  • Ability to work and achieve goals as a member of a team;
  • Capacity for leadership, including the ability to make rational decisions while complying with a set of standards;
  • Ability to perform and behave in a professional manner acceptable for career goals;
  • Ability to make appropriate future decisions based on past and present conditions and circumstances;

Civic and Global Learning

  • Basic knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of diverse social and political values;
  • Capacity for ethical reasoning, including the ability to make decisions and act in a socially responsible manner;
  • Ability to integrate knowledge and skills in civic and global contexts;
  • Capacity for empathy, including an appreciation for diversity and inclusion;
  • Capacity for civic action, including the ability to engage in service that benefits the public good.

Methods of Assessment
The Outcomes Assessment program relies on a number of different methods for measuring the effectiveness of the educational process, including the following:

Departmental Self-Study: About every five years, each academic department conducts a self-assessment using appropriate guidelines and develops an action plan based on the assessment results and recommendations from external reviewers. Self-studies assess curriculum, faculty, and available resources.

Writing Assessment Program: All incoming students will be required to participate in a writing assessment program, which includes a writing placement test to evaluate the writing skills of all incoming first-year students and a sophomore writing proficiency examination (WPE). All students must pass the WPE as part of the graduation requirement or, if they fail the WPE, must take HU-6062 Writing in Style.

United States Coast Guard License Examination: This is a standardized examination administered by the United States Coast Guard to the two maritime license majors. Marine Transportation students are examined in Rules of the Road, General Deck Questions, General Navigation Questions, Safety, and Navigational Problems. Marine Engineering students are examined in General Subjects, Electricity, Steam Plants, Motor Plants, Gas Turbine Plants, and Engineering Safety.

Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) Quality Standards System: The International Maritime Organization requires all training and assessment to be “continuously monitored through a quality standards system to ensure achievement of defined objectives.” Each student must meet qualifications in both academic coursework and practical training areas. Courses in Marine Transportation and Marine Engineering have been designed such that the defined standards are embedded throughout the curriculum and assessed through written and oral projects, examinations, and practical performance. All students participating in STCW courses are held to the same standards, regardless of major.

Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination: All Energy Systems Engineering students will be required to take the nationwide FE examination in the spring semester of their senior year. This computer-based examination format is overseen by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES).

FEQE—Facilities Engineering Qualification Examination: The FEQE is required of all Facilities Engineering majors in order to graduate. The examination was developed by the Engineering Department to serve as the primary assessment tool for the major and comprises two sections. Section One includes assessment of all major topics, and Section Two is based on technical writing skills.

Marine Engineering Qualification Program: All Marine Engineering students participate in the Engineering Qualification Program. The purpose of the program is to ensure that each student in the Marine Engineering Program attains an increasing level of shipboard engineering expertise each year while at the Academy, can operate the training ship machinery efficiently and safely, and can demonstrate a satisfactory level of basic engineering knowledge prior to graduation.

ETS Proficiency Profile: This test provides benchmarking for general education subjects.

Academic Support

Academic Support Services

Academic Advising
The academic advising system is an integral part of the student experience at MMA. Students are able to rely on the experience of the faculty and the up-to-date information faculty provide in order to facilitate their studies. Advisors are available to assist students in developing their educational plan; in selecting a major, minor, or concentration; and in registering for courses. The advisor may provide guidance regarding academic alerts, mid-term deficiency reports, and academic probation. Most importantly, advisors are available to students seeking assistance concerning course material. In short, the academic advisor’s knowledge and experience can be valuable resources for students.

Academic Faculty Advisor
The academic advising system is an integral part of the student experience at MMA. Students are able to rely on the experience of the faculty and the up-to-date information faculty provide in order to facilitate their studies. Advisors are available to assist students in developing their educational plan; in selecting a major, minor, or concentration; and in registering for courses. The advisor may provide guidance regarding academic alerts, mid-term deficiency reports, and academic probation. Most importantly, advisors are available to students seeking assistance concerning course material. In short, the academic advisor’s knowledge and experience can be valuable resources for students.

Your academic advisor’s name and contact information can be found in WebAdvisor under “My Profile.” on WebAdvisor. You should schedule an appointment with your advisor to introduce yourself, and you should plan to meet with your advisor at least twice during the academic semester. By doing so, you will help ensure that you will proceed successfully through your academic program. As a faculty member, your advisor will post his or her office hours on his or her office door and on the syllabus of each course he or she teaches. Faculty office hours are also available in the office of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies.

In addition to faculty advising, the Academic Resource Center has an advising office in which advisors provide supplemental advising by appointment or on a drop-in basis. The advising offered through this office does not substitute for a student’s required consultations with his or her faculty advisor.

Cadet Training and Retention Officer (CTRO)
There is a 1/C cadet officer in each company who is charged with the oversight of training and retention initiatives at the company level.  Such initiatives include in-company tutoring programs and academic early-alert notification.

American Bureau of Shipping Information Commons
This facility welcomes you to an outstanding collection of books, periodicals, newspapers, media and databases. This library contains more than 50,000 volumes and 175 newspaper and periodical subscriptions. CD-ROM discs and workstations maintain up-to-date data on the Code of Federal Regulations, environmental issues, and marine technology. The Information Commons is fully automated through the Southeastern Automated Library System, affording over two-million volumes by courier service.

During the academic year the Information Commons is open as follows:

            Monday-Thursday:  0730-2200             Friday:                  0730-1600

            Saturday:              1000-1600               Sunday:                1400-2200

Information Commons will extend their hours the week prior to finals and during finals week.

Academic Resource Center

The Academy is firmly committed to assisting students in maintaining satisfactory progress in their degree programs by providing assessment, tutoring, and supplemental advising resources through its Academic Resource Center (ARC), located on the third floor of the ABS Information Commons. The ARC provides tutoring throughout the academic year at no cost to students. It comprises three academic support units: the Assessment and Advising Center (AAC), the Learning Resource Center (LRC), and the Writing Resource Center (WRC). Services are offered in a supportive, accommodating learning environment by appointment and on a drop-in basis. ARC services and resources impart valuable skills for success in college.

Each ARC unit provides critical support in a particular area. The AAC administers standard assessment instruments, evaluates student proficiencies, and offers academic support and advising services. The LRC offers tutoring in science, mathematics, engineering, and a variety of technical and business courses. The WRC offers tutoring in written and verbal communication to support literature and composition courses as well as many other courses with an oral or written communication component. The WRC also assists students with professional correspondence relevant to their future careers.

Students are strongly encouraged to utilize the services and resources available at the Academic Resource Center, the primary mission of which is to help them achieve success in their academic programs.

Faculty and peer tutors are available each semester for individual and small group tutoring sessions in writing, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, business, and other courses.

Disability Resource Office
Because Massachusetts Maritime Academy is dedicated to the equality of educational opportunity, it is strongly committed to the creation of a campus environment free of discrimination and bias in matters affecting students with documented learning or other disabilities.

The Academy provides reasonable accommodations for students with documented disabilities. The Director of Disability Resources works in collaboration with faculty and other campus departments to provide support for students with disabilities and to ensure equal access to all college programs. This coordination of efforts complies with the mandates of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the ADA Amendments Act of 2009. The Disability Resource Office is located on the third floor of the Harrington building. For questions or concerns about documentation guidelines or the accommodations process, please call Professor Tishkevich, the Director of Disability Resources, at (508) 830-5000, ext. 2208, or visit the Disability Resource link on our web site.

All students who are eligible for academic accommodations due to a documented learning and/or other disability are requested to contact Dr. Tishkevich, who will provide academic accommodation verification letters to each of a student’s professors, as warranted.

Mathematics at MMA
Because the MMA degree program curricula are Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), a solid foundation in mathematics is expected of all students. Proficiency in mathematics is absolutely essential for success in these programs. The Academy, therefore, urges students whose Accuplacer College Level Mathematics scores indicate the need for remedial work (score less than 40) to improve their mathematics skills prior to their first semester. Any student who successfully completes one of the three remediation options prior to the start of the fall semester will not need any additional remediation.  Historical data show that students in need of remediation have a significantly reduced chance of performing to standards in the Algebra/ Trigonometry course. Any student who scored less than 40 on the Accuplacer College Level mathematics and did not successfully complete any of the three remediation options prior to the fall semester will be limited to 12 course credits for the first semester. Although the student will be placed in Algebra/Trigonometry, the student will find the course very challenging and will struggle to learn new concepts and skills without the benefit of having mastered those skills expected of entering college students. In fall semester, the student will also be required to undertake a specific number of hours of mandatory tutoring per week offered through the Academic Resource Center. Near the beginning of the semester, students will be notified of the hours required and when mandatory tutoring will begin.

 

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