Regimental Manual - APPENDIX H

APPENDIX H
Reviewed 22 February 2018

MASSACHUSETTS MARITIME ACADEMY
UNITED STATES COAST GUARD POLICY ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND CONDUCT

HIGHLIGHT POINTS OF NEW USCG POLICY ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND CONDUCT

Massachusetts Maritime Academy (MMA) has been notified by the US Coast Guard (USCG) that certain procedures we have followed concerning chemical testing reporting and rehabilitation must be modified.  The result of this new process will allow MMA a higher confidence that the procedures we follow for returning cadets will, in fact, be unified with Coast Guard processes and therefore give the cadets greater assurance that license issue is probable.

WHO DOES THIS EFFECT?

All cadets at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy

WHAT IS REPORTED?

     1. Use or possession of controlled substance;
     2. Alcohol infractions, such as intoxication or driving under the influence;
     3. Possession of weapon;
     4. Assault; and 
     5. Theft

WHAT IS THE PROCESS AFFECTING the Merchant Mariners Credential (MMC) or license?

The US Coast Guard will determine exactly what effect the infractions will have upon the individual cadets.

     a) As an example, the harshest actions would be for those cadets who possesses an MMC.  If a cadet tests positive for a controlled substance, he/she will immediately have their MMC revoked.  MMA will dismiss the cadet, and the USCG will then guide the mariner to follow a "cure process" that will probably take at least 15-18 months.
     b) If no document is possessed, then MMA will dismiss the cadet and initiate the USCG Cure policy as stated above; and 
     c) Misconduct is referred to as any violation of laws or regulations, but also includes failure to comply with shipboard regulations.  As an example, a cadet gets into a fight aboard ship and is brought forward on Class I charges for assault.  If that cadet is found guilty and disciplined via either suspension of dismissal, then we are required to report the circumstance to the Coast Guard.

Cadets must realize that regardless of major, while aboard ship and complying with the ship’s regulations, they are subject to disciplinary reporting to the US Coast Guard.  Should the cadet return to the Academy and continue matriculation without any further problems, then the Academy will give the USCG a positive character reference on the license application.  The USCG may do a separate investigation into the character of the cadet (applicant for license).

The overpowering message that the Coast Guard is sending is that they want to insure that they only issue licenses (including MMC) to men and women of good character.