Academic Standards Class of 2019

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Academic Programs 

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is a special mission college of the Massachusetts state university system offering a curriculum leading to seven degrees accredited by the New
England Association of Schools and Colleges. The following degrees are awarded:  Bachelor of Science in Marine Transportation, Bachelor of Science in Marine Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Facilities Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Energy Systems Engineering, Bachelor of Science in International Maritime Business, Bachelor of Science in Marine Safety and Environmental Protection, and Bachelor of Science in Emergency Management.

Academic Information

The Academy’s curricula are continually evolving in response to changes in the maritime industry and its associated industries.  The Academy works to provide an exceptionally high level of academic support for an excellent instructional program.  Course requirements and offerings are routinely evaluated and revised by departmental committees, the Curriculum Committee, and the All-College Committee.  The following information incorporates changes made through the 2014-2015 academic year and introduced for academic year 2015-2016.  Federally mandated Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) may require curriculum changes which are not yet reflected in this handbook but which may affect students entering or returning to the Academy for the fall term.

General Academic Program Information

The first semester curriculum and a Sea Term experience are common to most students. Before the second semester starts, students register for classes specific to their chosen degree programs. The curriculum sequencing outlined beginning on page 16 of this document is to be followed for students remaining course of study at the Academy. To the greatest extent possible, this selection is voluntary; however, when necessary, students are assigned to a specific curriculum based on academic performance.

The academic year is comprised of two academic semesters of approximately fifteen weeks each and an off-campus work experience: either a Sea Term or a Cooperative Program

The academic program is contained within a five-day week, exclusive of holidays, with eight, fiftyminute classroom periods each day from 0800 to 1550. Laboratory sessions cover two or more periods, and some lectures extend for one and one-half periods.  

Normally, each student is enrolled in five or six academic courses per semester. However, a student can retain full-time status by maintaining a minimum course load of twelve credit hours each academic semester. Students who do not successfully complete all of the courses designated up to the appropriate semesters in the curriculum for their major must understand that such failure may affect their class designation, their expected date of graduation, and their eligibility for financial aid.

To carry a semester course load in excess of 19.5 credits, a student must first consult his or her academic advisor and then obtain permission from the Academic Dean or his designee. 

The curriculum for each major is designed to be completed in a systematic and sequential manner. Each semester, students are expected to enroll in courses appropriate to their academic standing and class designation.

Semester hour credits (also called “academic credits”) are assigned to each course. In general, one classroom contact hour or two laboratory hours comprise one semester hour credit.

Majors

The Academy currently offers students seven academic majors in Marine Engineering, Marine Transportation, Facilities Engineering, Marine Safety and Environmental Protection, International Maritime Business, Emergency Management, and Energy Systems Engineering, each leading to the Bachelor of Science degree.  

Marine Transportation
This major prepares students for careers as licensed ship’s officers, and allows them to easily transfer into management and operations positions within the Transportation, Intermodal, and Petroleum industries.  The professional education aims to prepare cadets for eventual achievement of the Master Mariner level.  Marine Transportation majors receive extensive theoretical and practical education in navigation, seamanship, ship construction, design, and damage control.  Students train on Ship Simulators and sail in Academy training vessels.  The opportunity to sail with a commercial company During the junior year provides an excellent chance to learn the industry first-hand, establish contacts, and better prepare students for graduation the following year.  Students must qualify through examination by the United States Coast Guard as Third Mate, Steam and Motor Vessels of Unlimited Tonnage Upon Oceans, which requires satisfactory completion of STCW 2010 Manila Amendment requirements in order to graduate.

Marine Engineering
This major prepares students for careers as licensed engineering officers in the United States Merchant Marine and for engineering positions in associated shoreside industries.  Courses include Internal and External Combustion Engines, Electricity and Electronics, Auxiliaries and Main Propulsion Machinery, and the organization and operation of merchant vessel engineering plants.  In addition, students study preventative maintenance, gain practical experience aboard ship in port and on the high seas, and work in laboratories to learn other skills in a variety of closely connected fields.  The opportunity to sail with a commercial company on Sea Term III provides an excellent chance to learn the industry first-hand, establish contacts, and better prepare students for graduation the following year.  Students must qualify through examination by the United States Coast Guard as Third Assistant Engineers, Steam and Motor, Unlimited Horsepower, which requires satisfactory completion of STCW 2010 Manila Amendment requirements in order to graduate.  The ultimate aim is to prepare the student to eventually reach the level of Chief Engineer.

Facilities Engineering
This major prepares students for the safe and economical operation of the variety of equipment found in industrial plants, office buildings, hospitals, power plants, and all facilities requiring heat, air conditioning, and electrical power.  The program combines theoretical and applied engineering with special emphasis on practical engineering laboratories, compliance with environmental regulations, and resolution of environmental problems. The curriculum also includes three six-week co-operatives with industry providing valuable on-the-job experience often leading to employment opportunities.  In place of one co-operative, a student may, after successfully completing MT-1121 STCW Basic Training, choose to cruise on the Academy’s training ship to gain experience with a 15,500 SHP steam plant.

Energy Systems Engineering
This program will prepare graduates for careers in the many varied segments of the fast growing energy industry in positions that provide for the engineering planning, design, and installation of various equipment and systems required for the generation, management and distribution of electrical power. ESE major courses include advance mathematic and applied engineering courses along with specific courses that address the design of alternative and renewable energy systems.  The curriculum includes two summer ESE co-operatives. The ESE co-operative program provides the students with energy industry specific opportunities to gain first-hand industry knowledge, establish professional contacts, and develop future employment options.  Students in the ESE program will be required to take the nationwide Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam in the spring semester of their senior year.  Students in the ESE program can also take a USCG marine engineer license option.  This option will require a fifth year to accommodate marine engineering coursework and will require three additional sea terms taken during the students' sophomore through fifth year winter sessions.  During the spring semester of their fifth year, the license option students would take the USCG Third Assistant Engineer's license exam. Professional accreditation by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) has been pursued for the ESE program.

Marine Safety and Environmental Protection
This major prepares students for a wide range of professional positions in the fields of environmental protection, environmental management, and marine and industrial health and safety.  Students receive a multi-disciplinary, integrated education in sciences, management, law, communications, and safety as related to environmental issues.  Students participate in a two week Experiential Learning during the winter of their freshman year to become familiar with marine and terrestrial systems.  They will also conduct an environmental or safety co-operative experience.  Concentration sequences, elective courses, independent studies, and co-operatives enable students to tailor their academic program to meet individual interests and to gain valuable hands-on experience.  In addition, opportunities exist for collaboration with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and other local, state, and national organizations.

Emergency Management
The primary purpose of the Emergency Management program is to serve the developing need for the emergency management professional to address natural and man-made disasters.  These newly trained professionals will bring to the field a knowledge-based, scientific approach to proactive strategic planning.  Career opportunities include public sector positions in disaster preparedness, response and recovery, and private sector positions in business continuity and risk management.  In keeping with our mission to serve the maritime industry, the curriculum particularly emphasizes coastal and port security.  In addition to in the three week Experiential Learning during the winter of their freshman year, this program requires two co-operative experiences.

International Maritime Business
This major, recently accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE), prepares graduates to enter maritime shipping as business professionals.  The program includes elements of international business, logistics and transportation.  The curriculum includes introductory courses in vessel familiarization and engineering; cognate courses in such marine operations areas as marine safety and cargo operations; and courses in economics, accounting, business, and management.  It also includes a capstone seminar in international maritime business during the senior year.  This major requires experiential learning and two co-operative experiences.

Dual Degrees

Students with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 may enroll in a dual-degree program with the permission of the department chairperson of each program. Interested students may pursue dual-degree combinations by presenting their proposals for approval by the chairperson of each department.  In order to officially declare a dual major before the end of the third semester, a student must have completed either Calculus I or Applied Calculus. Note: Students considering a dual-major with engineering have only two dual-degree options: Marine Engineering with Energy Systems Engineering or Marine Engineering with Marine Transportation. Any student considering one of these options should consult with the Engineering Department chairperson prior to the end of the first academic semester. Students should expect to spend more than eight semesters in completing a dual-degree program.

Minors

The Academy currently offers seven academic minors to enhance its graduates’ preparation.  A minor is a program of study of at least eighteen credits outside the major and normally begin in the junior year.  Students electing to take a minor must consult the faculty coordinator for approval.  Due to additional academic demands, students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher. To declare a minor prior to the junior year, a student must also have completed either Calculus I or Applied Calculus. A brief statement of the purpose of each minor is given below.  

American Studies

The American Studies Minor (Coordinator: Dr. Kathryn Mudgett) provides students with a greater understanding of American culture through the study of American history, foreign policy, literature, and artistic endeavor. The minor consists of six courses, three from the Humanities Department and three from the Social Science Department, following completion of the General Education requirements. The following courses are required: HU-5032 American Literature I: Colonial Period to Civil War; HU-5033 American Literature II: Civil War to Present; and two of the following courses: SS-3219 American History I: Origins to 1865; SS-3220 American History II: Civil War to Present; or SS-3211 American Maritime History.  Finally, students must take one additional Humanities elective identified by “American” in the title and one additional Social Science elective from the following courses: SS-3217 Vietnam and U.S. Policy; SS-3218 Civil War & Reconstruction; or SS-3212 U.S. Foreign Policy Since 1945.

Emergency Management

The Energy Management Minor (Coordinator: Professor George Howe) is offered by the Engineering department to Marine and Facilities Engineers to better prepare them for careers ashore and/or advanced studies in energy management, alternative and renewable energy, and power generation fields as they relate to the operation of large, complex facilities.  Course requirements are SM-2218 Statistics or SM-3005 Probability and Statistics EN-3801 Energy Strategy and Management EN-3802 Energy Systems and a choice of three courses from a selected group of electives.

Facilities Operation

The Facilities Operation Minor (Coordinator: Professor George Howe) prepares students for careers ashore and/or for advanced studies in facilities management, stationary engineering (power generation), or wastewater treatment technology, as they relate to the operation of large, complex facilities. The minor is offered to students enrolled in either the Marine Engineering or Energy Systems Engineering major. Required courses are: EN-2222 Commercial Boilers, EN-3214 Municipal Wastewater Treatment, EN-4222 HVAC, and a choice of three courses from a selected group of electives. 

Industrial Health & Safety

The Industrial Health & Safety Minor (Coordinator: Professor Francis Veale) is offered by the Environmental Protection, Safety, and Emergency Management Department.  To earn a minor in Industrial Health and Safety, students must complete each of the following required six courses. Required courses are: MS-XXXX Industrial Hygiene Auditing, EM-2111 Infectious Agents, EM-3212 Toxicology, EM-3213 Public Health Issues in Emergency Management MS-4271 Advanced Principles of Industrial Health and Safety SM-3111 Introduction to Radiological Materials.

International Maritime Business

The International Maritime Business Minor (Coordinator: Dr. Bani Ghosh) is offered to seagoing majors who have plans to start a shore-based career, for those interested in a graduate degree in business or law, and for those inclined towards entrepreneurial ventures. The IMB minor provides a basic business background with specialization in the shipping industry.  Course requirements are: IM-2121 Principles of Accounting I and IM-2211 The Business of Shipping.  Students must choose four of the following: Any course with an IM designation as long as prerequisites are met, MT-3252 Port and Terminal Operations Management , and SM-2117 Quantitative Methods for Management.

Law

The Law Minor (Coordinator: Professor Ronald Carroll), offered by the Social Science Department, provides students with a range of understanding about the law through a diverse array of law courses.  Students learn to study law from a variety of perspectives.  Course requirements are any six from the following list of courses: SS-3221 Business Law; SS-3222 Real Estate Law; SS-3223 European Union Law; SS-3224 International Business Law; SS-3225 Admiralty and Maritime Law; SS-4122 International Law; MS-3142 Environmental Law; and/or SS-4132 Legal Issues in Emergency Management.

Marine Biology

The Marine Biology Minor (Coordinator: Dr. Alan White) is offered by the Environmental Protection, Safety, and Emergency Management Department.  To earn this minor, students must take the six following courses: MS-4305 Principles of Aquaculture; MS-4322 Marine Botany; MS-4329 Marine Mammals; MS-4333 Marine Invertebrate Zoology; MS-4334 Tropical Marine Ecology; and MS-4342 Marine Microbiology.

Marine Safety and Environmental Protection

The Marine Safety and Environmental Protection Minor (Coordinator: Dr. Alan White) is offered by the Environmental Protection, Safety, and Emergency Management Department.  To earn a minor in Marine Safety and Environmental Protection, students must complete each of the following four courses and choose to complete one of the two options (I-II). Required courses are: MS-3141 Coastal Ecology, MS-3142 Environmental Law, MS-3221 Oceanography, and MS-4263 Oil Spill Management. Choose one option: Option I: MS-4142 Human Health and Risk MS-4241 Environmental Risk  or Option II: Students must choose two courses from the following: MS-4141 Coastal Zone Management MS-4264 Conservation Biology, MS-4305 Principles of Aquaculture, MS-4321 Biology of Fishes, MS-4322 Marine Botany, MS-4329 Marine Mammals, MS-4333 Marine Invertebrate, Zoology MS-4334 Tropical Marine Ecology MS-4341 Ecological Sustainability MS-4342 Marine Microbiology.

Concentrations

With departmental permission, students with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher may enroll in a concentration of study. A concentration is a program of study of at least twelve credits within the student’s major field but the courses of which are not prescribed in the major program.  These courses are typically taken during semesters five through eight. The following concentrations are currently offered at Massachusetts Maritime Academy. 

The Marine Biology Concentration elective sequence options are provided to give students enrolled in the Marine Safety and Environmental Protection major a series of electives focused on particular aspects of the field of marine biology.  These normally begin in the first semester of the junior year and replace the regularly scheduled free and departmental electives: MS-4305 Principles of Aquaculture; MS-4321 Biology of Fishes; MS-4322 Marine Botany; and MS-4333 Marine Invertebrate Zoology.

Massachusetts Maritime Academy Undergraduate Curriculum 

Major Programs

A major program at Massachusetts Maritime Academy includes approximately 128 credits of academic semester courses plus sea terms and/or cooperative programs. Programs of study for each of the Academy’s degree programs are shown in tables in a later section. Within each program the academic courses are designated in the categories of Major courses, General Education courses, and Support courses. This designation is included in the outline of the courses for each major program. Each major program includes at least two free electives. Students may choose to add more free elective courses or a minor or concentration sequence of elective courses.

Major Courses

Approximately sixty credits in each major are designated as Major courses. These courses are professional in nature, related specifically to the degrees offered, and usually offered by the department of the major program.

General Education Courses

Certain required courses in the Humanities Department, the Social Science Department, and the Science and Mathematics Department are designated as General Education courses. Some of these courses are specified, and some are selected by the student. Additional information is included in the “General Education Requirements” section.

Support Courses

Courses that are outside of those designated as Major courses or General Education courses but which are required by a major program are designated as Support courses.

Sea Terms, Cooperative Programs, and Experiential Learning

During August orientation, all first-year students are required to participate in a freshman mini-cruise Students in license majors (Marine Engineering and Marine Transportation) are required to participate in four seagoing experiences, three aboard the USTS Kennedy (freshman, sophomore and senior years) and one aboard a commercial vessel (junior year).

Students in the Marine Transportation or Marine Engineering program must complete sea service, satisfying STCW and U.S. Coast Guard license criteria. Sea service is accrued by sailing on the USTS Kennedy and by sailing on commercial ships. Commercial shipping experiences must comply with USCG and MARAD requirements. Equivalent sea time calculations are in compliance with USCG program approval.

Pre-requisites for Sea Term I include successful completion of:

  • MT-1121 STCW Basic Training
  • EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety
  • SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry (C- or above for Marine Engineers).

Additionally, any student who falls below Academic Good Standing (GPA below 1.5) will be removed from Sea Term I and expected to take winter classes at MMA to strengthen their GPA.

Students enrolled in shore-side majors must complete cooperative education placements as required by the program. The Office of Career and Professional Services will assist students in locating and setting up cooperative education placements. Grades from cooperative education placements are included in the calculation of the Cumulative Quality Point Average (CQPA). Six credits are earned for each successful co-op experience. Grades from sea terms and/or cooperative programs that are designated by the major department are included in the calculation of the average in the major.

Depending upon the major, students completing a non-license degree program may be required to complete experiential learning opportunities. These opportunities introduce students to public service in organizations and working environments related to a specific program of study. Through instruction and practice, the experiences reinforce core concepts learned within the degree major. Students earn three academic credits for successfully completing experiential learning opportunities. The length of such opportunities varies and the credits for the experiential learning varies by major. 

Non-Regimental Commuter Student Status

MMA has always been a regimentally based student life program, with only 1% or 2% non-regimental commuter students on campus at any one time.  Non-traditional students may seek to enroll in Facilities Engineering, Energy Systems Engineering, Marine Safety and Environmental Protection, International Maritime Business, or Emergency Management programs as non-uniformed, commuter students. Non-regimental commuter status is limited to non-traditional students with unique situations such as prior military service, a prior degree (associates or bachelors), or considerable life experience. To be considered for enrollment, a prospective non-traditional student must petition, in writing, the Dean of Enrollment Management. Acceptance will be determined, on a competitive basis, by a committee composed of the Dean of Enrollment Management, the chair of the applicable department, and the Registrar. Curriculum for non-regimental commuter students is adjusted slightly to remove the freshman sea term experience and possibly Sea Term related freshmen courses.

General Education Requirements

Students at Massachusetts Maritime Academy participate in the General Education curriculum in order to succeed in the career positions they will move into following graduation.  Moving beyond the bounds of the major requirements, students are encouraged to become lifelong learners through a balanced variety of courses.  These courses contain enough depth and breadth in each of the areas of Mathematics, Science, Humanities and Social Science to afford the student with the skills necessary to function in an increasingly complex world.  These fields of knowledge foster aesthetic appreciation, critical thinking, ethical analysis and evaluation, citizenship, and strong communication skills necessary for further self-development and personal inquiry.  The courses which fulfill the General Education requirements for each department are described below.

Humanities

The required courses from the Humanities Department build skills in reading, writing, critical thinking, and communication; aesthetic and cultural awareness; and humanistic inquiry.  In the first semester, students take a composition course that focuses on the skills necessary for logical presentation of thoughts and ideas in clear, concise language.  In the second semester, students take Analysis and Interpretation of Literature, where they read, analyze, and interpret fiction, poetry, and drama for meaning, technique, culture and historical context, and significance as literary art.  In addition, students are required to choose two electives in the Humanities: a literature course (Group I) chosen from a variety of genres, historical periods, and subject matter, followed by either another literature course or a non-literature course (Group II) chosen from a broad range of offerings within the department.

  • GEHU1: HU-1111 English Composition or HU-6012 Advanced Expository Writing (with permission of the department chair)
  • GEHU2: HU-1222 Analysis and Interpretation of Literature
  • GEHU3: Select one course from Humanities Group I.
  • GEHU4: Select either one course from Humanities Group II or a second course from Humanities Group I.  

Humanities Group I

  • HU-5021 Literature of the Sea
  • HU-5022 Literature and Film
  • HU-5023 Irish Literature
  • HU-5024 Shakespeare Tragedies and Comedies
  • HU-5025 Short Stories
  • HU-5026 Literature and Mythology
  • HU-5027 Literature of the Supernatural
  • HU-5028 Drama
  • HU-5029 Contemporary Literature
  • HU-5030 Poetry
  • HU-5031 War Literature
  • HU-5032 American Literature I: Colonial to Civil War
  • HU-5033 American Literature II: Civil War to the Present
  • HU-5034 Writers of the American South 8
  • HU-5035 American Theater
  • HU-5036 Survival Literature
  • HU-5038 Moby Dick
  • HU-5039 Detective Literature
  • HU-5090 Special Topics: Humanities Group I  

Humanities Group II

  • HU-2141 Spanish I
  • HU-2242 Spanish II
  • HU-2341 Elementary Chinese I
  • HU-2342 Elementary Chinese II
  • HU-2441 German I
  • HU-2442 German II
  • HU-5037 Discipline and Punishment
  • HU-6012 Advanced Expository Writing
  • HU-6051 Philosophy
  • HU-6054 Ethics
  • HU-6055 Introduction to World Religions
  • HU-6056 The Brain, Narrative, and the Self
  • HU-6057 Composing in New Media
  • HU-6060 Creative Writing Seminar: Poetry
  • HU-6061 Creative Writing Seminar: Fiction and Non-Fiction
  • HU-6062 Writing in Style
  • HU-6071 Public Speaking
  • HU-6072 Business Communications
  • HU-6073 Technical Writing
  • HU-6080 Introduction to Art
  • HU-6090 Special Topics: Humanities Group II 

Social Sciences  

The required courses from the Social Sciences Department strive to make students aware of the richness of their civilization and society and prepare them to think critically about their world.  They also strengthen their skills in written and oral expression.  Students first study the social, intellectual, political, and economic history of the modern era in Western Civilization and then explore the nature of American political culture in American Government.  After taking two courses as a base, students take three additional courses from the Social Sciences Department.  They will take one course in each of three groupings, which will further broaden their critical thinking and written skills.  The underlying principles of our economic system, the dynamics of capitalism, as well as the fundamentals of the international economy are studies in Group I where the students choose either Macroeconomics or Microeconomics. To acquire a clear understanding of the legal regulations and legal dynamics of the fields they are entering, students choose one course from Group II.  Finally, to strengthen this background, students select one additional course from the Social Sciences Department from a wider range of available offerings (Group III) in history, geography, sociology, psychology, anthropology, the behavior sciences, economics and economic policy, or military affairs.

  • GESS-1: SS-1211 Western Civilization
  • GESS-2: SS-2121 American Government
  • GESS-3: Select one course from Social Sciences Group I
  • GESS-4: Select one course from Social Sciences Group II
  • GESS-5: Select one course from Social Sciences Group III 

GESS-3 Social Sciences Group I

  • SS-2131 Microeconomics
  • SS-2231 Macroeconomics 9

GESS-4 Social Sciences Group II

  • MS-3142 Environmental Law1
  • SS-3221 Business Law
  • SS-3222 Real Estate Law
  • SS-3223 European Union Law
  • SS-3224 International Business Law
  • SS-3225 Admiralty & Maritime Law
  • SS-4122 International Law
  • SS-4123 International Law & Legislative Compliance
  • SS-4132 Legal Issues in Emergency Management

GESS-5 Social Sciences Group III

  • SS-2232 World Economic Geography
  • SS-2233 Political Geography
  • SS-3141 Introduction to Psychology
  • SS-3211 American Maritime History
  • SS-3212 U.S. Foreign Policy since 1945
  • SS-3213 Sea Power in World History
  • SS-3214 Europe in the Middle Ages
  • SS-3216 Ancient History Seminar
  • SS-3217 Vietnam and U.S. Policy
  • SS-3218 Civil War and Reconstruction
  • SS-3219 American History I: Origins to 1865
  • SS-3220 American History II: 1865 to Present
  • SS-3233 Chinese Economy
  • SS-3241 Sociology
  • SS-3242 Ancient Greece
  • SS-3243 Ancient Rome
  • SS-3246 U.S. Energy Policy: Both Global and Domestic
  • SS-4311 20th Century History
  • SS-4317 Intelligence and National Security Policy

Science and Mathematics

The required courses from the Science and Mathematics Department enhance the ability to think quantitatively, critically, and logically and they illustrate the manner in which problems of a quantitative nature are solved through the use of algorithms and logical thought.  Students study fundamental mathematical functions in Algebra and Trigonometry and explore the basic concepts of analysis of these functions in either Calculus I or Applied Calculus, depending on their major.  Then students select one additional mathematics course with a Calculus I or Applied Calculus prerequisite.  Thus, students learn to use mathematics, including calculus, in problem solving, to use technology appropriately in this process, and to apply mathematics to problems arising in other disciplines.  In the required science courses students apply the scientific method in a variety of classroom and laboratory settings.  In so doing, they develop the ability to carefully collect, organize, and analyze data for the purpose of synthesizing a model for better understanding or problem solving.  Basic concepts of matter are explored in Chemistry I to increase a student’s understanding of technology, health and environmental issues.  Students study the laws of nature in College Physics I, Survey of Physics, or Engineering Physics I in order to develop a method of reasoning that will enable students to interpret physical events in a rational manner.  To add necessary depth to their study of natural science, students also select a sequential laboratory science course in either chemistry or physics. 

  • GESM-1: SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry
  • GESM-2: SM-1131 Chemistry I
  • GESM-3: SM-1212 Calculus I or SM-1214 Applied Calculus 
  • GESM-4: Select one course from Science and Mathematics Group I.
  • GESM-5: Select one course from Science and Mathematics Group II.
  • GESM-6: Select one course from Science and Mathematics Group III.  

Science and Mathematics Group I

  • SM-2113 Calculus II
  • SM-2115 Applied Environmental Mathematics
  • SM-2117 Quantitative Methods for Management
  • SM-2119 Applied Mathematics for Deck Officers

Science and Mathematics Group II

  • SM-2121 College Physics I
  • SM-2123 Engineering Physics I
  • SM-2127 Survey of Physics

Science and Mathematics Group III

  • SM-1232 Chemistry II
  • SM-2222 College Physics II
  • SM-2224 Engineering Physics II
  • SM-2233 Organic/Hazardous Materials Chemistry

 

Prerequisite Courses

The following represents a list of prerequisites and corequisites for courses offered as of 1 September 2015.  This list may change during your four years at Massachusetts Maritime Academy.  The Course Catalog published each year will contain any changes.

  • Credit will not be given for both SM-2121 College Physics I and SM-2123 Engineering Physics I
  • Credit will not be given for both SM-2121 College Physics I and SM-2127 Survey of Physics
  • Credit will ne be given for both SM-2222 College Physics II and SM-2127 Survey of Physics
  • Credit will not be given for both SM-2123 Engineering Physics I and SM-2127 Survey of Physics

 

Marine Transportation Eligibility

To enroll in Marine Transportation, a student must pass MT-1121 STCW Basic Training with a grade of C- and EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety with a grade of C-. A student failing to meet either of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible.

Marine Engineering Eligibility

Marine Engineering students must pass MT-1121 STCW Basic Training and EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety with a minimum grade of C-. A student must also pass SM-1111 Algebra & Trigonometry by the second attempt, complete SM-1212 Calculus I by the start of the fourth semester and complete EN-2211Mechanics by the third attempt. A student failing to meet any of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible. Marine Engineers who fail to earn at least a C- in Algebra & Trigonometry will be removed from Sea Term I and encouraged to enroll and successfully complete Algebra & Trigonometry at MMA over the winter term.

Facilities Engineering Eligibility

Facilities Engineering students must pass EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety with a minimum grade of C- and SM-1111 Algebra & Trigonometry by the second attempt. A student must also complete SM-1212 Calculus I by the start of the fourth semester and a student must complete EN-2211 Mechanics by the third attempt. A student failing to meet any of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible. Facilities Engineers who fail to earn at least a C- in Algebra & Trigonometry are encouraged to enroll and successfully complete Algebra & Trigonometry at MMA over the winter term.

Energy Systems Engineering Eligibility

To be eligible for Energy Systems Engineering, a student must pass Engineering Systems and Safety (EN-1112) with a minimum grade of C-. Once enrolled in an Energy Systems Engineering, a student must complete Calculus I (SM-1212) by the end of the second semester. To remain enrolled in this major, a student must also achieve a grade of 70 or above in EN-2101Engineering Statics on the first attempt. A student failing to meet any of these requirements may remain at the Academy by enrolling in a major for which he or she remains eligible.

Non-Regimental Commuter Student Status

MMA has always been a regimentally based student life program, with only 1% or 2% non-regimental commuter students on campus at any one time.  Non-traditional students may seek to enroll in Facilities Engineering, Energy Systems Engineering, Marine Safety and Environmental Protection, International Maritime Business, or Emergency Management programs as non-uniformed, commuter students. Non-regimental commuter status is limited to non-traditional students with unique situations such as prior military service, a prior degree (associates or bachelors), or considerable life experience. To be considered for enrollment, a prospective non-traditional student must petition, in writing, the Dean of Enrollment Management. Acceptance will be determined, on a competitive basis, by a committee composed of the Dean of Enrollment Management, the chair of the applicable department, and the Registrar. Curriculum for non-regimental commuter students is adjusted slightly to remove the freshman sea term experience and possibly Sea Term related freshmen courses.

 

Academic Standards

Grades

Letter grades are assigned to students according to the following scale for each academic course:

Alphabetical Grade 4.0 Equivalent Alphabetical Grade 4.0 Equivalent
A 4.00 D+ 1.33
A- 3.67 D 1.00
B+ 3.33 D- .67
B 3.00 F 0.00
B- 2.67 P(Pass)  
C+ 2.33 I (Incomplete) ---
C 2.00 X (Exempt) ---
C- 1.67 W (Withdrawn) ---

A single, alphabetical grade certified by the instructor within the deadline published on the academic calendar is assigned to each student and submitted to the Registrar. Grade changes must be submitted in writing to the Registrar by the instructor within two weeks after the start of the term immediately following the term in which the grade was given.  An extension of the two-week period may only be allowed upon special arrangements by the instructor and the Vice President/Academic Dean.

Grade Appeal Policy

The Grade Appeal Policy is designed to resolve a student’s specific concerns with regard to a final course grade.  If such a concern exists, students are encouraged to avail themselves of this process mindful that no adverse consequences will result from making an informal or formal appeal.

If a student feels that a final course grade is inappropriate, the student must make an appointment with the faculty member to discuss the matter informally.  The appointment must be requested within the first two weeks of the academic semester following the semester for which the grade was given.  Every effort will be made to resolve the student’s concerns informally. 

If the student’s concerns are not resolved through the informal appeal policy, the student may pursue the formal appeal process by meeting with the appropriate department chair.  The burden of proof is on the student to show that a grade is inappropriate.  The formal appeal must be initiated within two weeks after the conclusion of the informal appeal process.  The formal appeal commences when the student submits in writing a description of the basis for the grievance, including any corroborating materials to the department chair.  The department chair will promptly notify the instructor of the formal appeal. Within two weeks of said notification, the instructor must then provide the department chair with a written response to the grade appeal.  The department chair will then make an assessment as to the validity of the student’s grievance and provide a written copy of the recommendation to both the instructor and the student.

Whatever the recommendation of the department chair, it remains the sole prerogative of the instructor to change the given grade.  Exceptions to the policy time limits of both the informal and formal appeal processes may be permitted if the Academic Dean determines that clear and compelling extenuating circumstances have occurred.

Incomplete

At the student’s request, an instructor may agree to award an incomplete grade (‘I’) if the student has failed to meet a course requirement due to illness or other reasons beyond his or her control.

Students are authorized a maximum of two weeks into the next term to rectify a grade of Incomplete. If the Incomplete is not rectified within that period, the Incomplete is automatically converted to a failure (‘F’).

An extended period may be allowed by the instructor upon approval of the Vice-President/Academic Dean. The instructor shall submit a recommended grade to the Registrar within 48 hours of the extended period allowed above.

Course Exemption

An exemption is awarded to a student who has been authorized by the Vice-President/Academic Dean or designee to omit taking a course. Exemptions apply only to the following:

  • Through Advanced Placement examination, with a grade of 3 or better, the student has been determined to be proficient in course subject matter.
  • Transfer credit may be awarded for International Baccalaure­ate (IB) higher level courses in which the student has earned a score of 4 or higher. Credit is not awarded for standard level courses. All decisions regarding transfer credit for IB courses will be made by the Registrar in consultation with the appropriate department chairperson.
  • Through validation of grades received at another accredited institution of higher education with a grade of ‘C’ or better.
  • Validation through analysis of certified professional licenses or transcripts of grades is made only by the Vice-President/Academic Dean or his designee.
  • College Level Examination Program and ATP examinations with a score at or above the national mean may be accepted for exemption with the approval of the Vice-President/Academic Dean or his designee.

Transfer Credits 

In order for a student enrolled at the Academy to receive credit for a course taken at another institution, the following conditions must be met:

  • The transfer course must be offered at an accredited institution.
  • The catalog description of the course must be substantially similar to that of the corresponding Academy course and be of equal or greater credit hours.
  • A request for approval to take the course for transfer credit must be submitted to the Academic Dean at least two weeks prior to the start of the course. 31
  • A student who requests a transfer course while enrolled during a semester at the Academy as a fulltime student will be reviewed specifically to determine whether the transfer course will constitute an overload or excessive load for the semester.
  • Authorization to take the course for transfer credit will be granted or denied at the discretion of the Academic Dean with the advice and consent of the respective Chair of the academic department in which the course is offered at the Academy.
  • A grade of ‘C’ or better (2.0 or higher) must be obtained for the course to be deemed successfully completed. The grade received for the course transferred will not be included in computing the student’s CQPA.
  • An official transcript showing completion of the course must be sent to the Registrar’s office no later than six weeks after the course completion.
  • With regard to on-line course offerings, a maximum of two courses will be eligible for transfer credit, but only one in a given academic department.
  • No Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) course may be taken on-line.
  • A student must be in good academic standing in accordance with MMA policy at the time of his/her request for taking an on-line course

Add /Drop Period

A student may add courses, consistent with other requirements, up to six business days into the semester.  A student may drop a course, consistent with other requirements, up to fifteen business days into the semester. 

Withdrawal Policy

If a student wishes to withdraw from a course after the add/drop period, he or she must obtain written acknowledgment from the instructor, the student’s academic advisor, and the Assistant Dean/Registrar.  It must be understood that such withdrawal may affect the student’s date of graduation, eligibility for financial aid, and class year designation.  Students may withdraw from no more than one course per semester.  No student may withdraw from a course after the tenth week of classes. Students may not withdraw from a course previously failed or from SM-1111.  No student may withdraw from the same course more than once. 

Quality Points

The student academic record contains an alphabetical grade for each course, a semester hour credit for each course, and a quality point notation for each course.  The quality point is the product of the alphabetical grade 4.0 point equivalent and the semester hour grade, e.g., grade ‘B’ (3.0 points) times 3 semester hour credits = 9 quality points.

At the end of each term, the quality points for each course are added together and the sum divided by the total of all credit hours to obtain a Term Quality Point Average (TQPA).

At the end of each academic term, the Cumulative Quality Point Average (CQPA) is computed by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the student since entrance to the college by the total number of credit hours. 

 

Pass–Fail Course Option

Eligibility:  In order to be eligible to request the Pass–Fail course option, a student must have a current academic standing of junior or senior status and a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or greater.  The option of any given free elective course to be taken for a Pass–Fail grade is at the sole discretion of the affected instructor.  In order to take an eligible course as Pass–Fail, the student must have a fully completed request form submitted to the Registrar prior to the end of the Add/Drop period, otherwise the student will be graded according to the existing Academic Standards.  Note: A student may take no more than one Pass–Fail course in a given semester and no more than two Pass–Fail courses as part of his or her overall curriculum. 

Eligible Courses:  As a general rule, the following courses are eligible for the Pass–Fail option: any elective course taken to fulfill an academic minor course requirement, any non-directed Humanities Group I or II taken as a free elective, any non-directed Social Science Group I, II, or III taken as a free elective, or any departmental course taken as a completely free elective.  Note: Any curriculum required general education course, support course, major course, or STCW course is not eligible for the pass-fail option. 

Grading:  The student’s grade shall be evaluated the same as all other students taking the course.  The student shall receive a P for a grade that exceeds the instructor’s established passing benchmark.  The student shall receive an F for a grade that falls below the instructor’s established passing benchmark. A passing grade of P will not affect the student’s overall GPA and will be excluded from any GPA calculations.  However, a failing grade of F will negatively affect the student’s GPA by the applicable course credit being added to the semester and cumulative GPA calculations.

STCW Compliance 

The international convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) is an international treaty that established minimum curriculum standards and performance measures for maritime training programs.  Certain courses are designated as containing STCW Knowledge or Practical elements.  All students, regardless of major, must earn a ‘C-’ or better to pass any course containing STCW knowledge components and must successfully complete all practical demonstrations in any course containing STCW Practical elements. Any STCW course serving as a prerequisite for another course must be passed with a minimum grade of C- to satisfy the prerequisite unless otherwise specified in the course description. 

In addition, students majoring in Marine Engineering or Marine Transportation must complete all STCW requirements for issuance of the appropriate U. S. Coast Guard merchant marine officer’s license. 

Mathematics at MMA 

Because the MMA degree program curricula are Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), a solid foundation in mathematics is expected of all students. Proficiency in mathematics is absolutely essential for success in these programs. The Academy, therefore, urges students whose Accuplacer College Level Mathematics scores indicate the need for remedial work (score less than 40) to improve their mathematics skills prior to their first semester. Any student who successfully completes one of the three remediation options prior to the start of the fall semester will not need any additional remediation.  Historical data show that students in need of remediation have a significantly reduced chance of performing to standards in the Algebra/ Trigonometry course. Any student who scored less than 40 on the Accuplacer College Level mathematics and did not successfully complete any of the three remediation options prior to the fall semester will be limited to 12 course credits for the first semester. Although the student will be placed in Algebra/Trigonometry, the student will find the course very challenging and will struggle to learn new concepts and skills without the benefit of having mastered those skills expected of entering college students.  In fall semester, the student will also be required to undertake six (6) hours of mandatory tutoring per week offered through the Academic Resource Center.

Academic Advising

The academic advising system is an integral part of the student experience at MMA. Students are able to rely on the experience of the faculty and the up-to-date information faculty provide in order to facilitate their studies.

Faculty Advisors are available to assist students in developing their educational plan; in selecting a major, minor, or concentration; and in registering for courses. The advisor may provide guidance regarding academic alerts, mid-term deficiency reports, and academic probation. Most importantly, advisors are available to students seeking assistance concerning course material. In short, the academic advisor’s knowledge and experience can be valuable resources for students. 

Academic Resource Center

The Academy is firmly committed to assisting students in maintaining satisfactory progress in their degree programs by providing assessment, tutoring, and advising resources through its Academic Resource Center (ARC), located on the third floor of the ABS Information Commons. The ARC provides tutoring throughout the academic year at no cost to students. It comprises three academic support units: the Assessment and Advising Center (AAC), the Learning Resource Center (LRC), and the Writing Resource Center (WRC). Services are offered in a supportive, accommodating learning environment by appointment and on a drop-in basis. ARC services and resources impart valuable skills for success in college.

Each ARC unit provides critical support in a particular area.  The AAC administers standard assessment instruments and evaluates student proficiencies. AAC offers drop-in academic advising to all students regardless of major and are meant to supplement Faculty Advising, not replace it. The LRC offers tutoring in science, mathematics, engineering, and a variety of technical and business courses.  The WRC offers tutoring in written and verbal communication to support literature and composition courses as well as many other courses with an oral or written communication component. The WRC also assists students with professional correspondence relevant to their future professional careers.

Students are strongly encouraged to utilize the services and resources available at the Academic Resource Center, whose primary mission is to help them achieve success in their academic programs.

Academic Assessment

Massachusetts Maritime Academy is committed to maintaining academic excellence and continuously improving the quality of our academic programs.  An ongoing Outcomes Assessment Program assesses and monitors the effectiveness of instruction and learning in order to identify academic weaknesses and areas of potential improvement.  All faculty and students participate in a variety of individual and program assessments to meet these objectives.  The names of students and faculty members are not used during the assessment process or when reporting results.

Students are assessed in five Core Competency areas described below.  These competencies are the essential skills and abilities that provide the educational foundation for all other courses, as well as for success beyond the Academy.  They are introduced, reinforced, or incorporated into many courses throughout the curriculum.  All students who graduate from Massachusetts Maritime Academy should achieve competency in the following areas:

  • Communication: Students should be able to read, write, and speak effectively in a variety of styles appropriate to a variety of audiences.
  • Scientific Literacy: Students should be able to understand the scientific method and how it is applied to establish new knowledge.
  • Quantitative Literacy: Students should be able to analyze and interpret numerical data and reason with quantitative information.
  • Higher Order Thinking: Students should be able to apply the elements of reasoning and be able to use criteria and intellectual standards in order to make decisions, analyze arguments, solve problems and create original ideas.
  • Technology Literacy: Students should be able to apply computer technology skills to acquire, organize, analyze, and communicate information

Learning Outcomes

Consistent with its mission of providing each undergraduate student with educational experiences employing both conventional classroom instruction and practical, hands-on experience in state-of-the-art simulators, aboard a seagoing training vessel, in shoreside laboratories, and in the workplace, Massachusetts Maritime Academy identified in 2010 the following student learning outcomes acquired by the typical students while completing an MMA degree program:

Intellectual Learning

  • Competency in written, oral, and listening skills;
  • Ability to critically and creatively comprehend and evaluate new information and ideas;
  • Ability to use quantitative reasoning skills, apply basic concepts of mathematics and science and utilizing relevant computer skills;
  • Basic knowledge and understanding of the social, physical, and life sciences;
  • Competency within the major.

Leadership & Personal Development

  • Ability to work and achieve goals as a member of a team;
  • Ability to make rational decisions while complying with a set of standards;
  • Ability to perform and behave in a professional manner acceptable for career goals;
  • A sense of curiosity;
  • Ability to make appropriate future decisions based on past and present conditions and circumstances.

Global Awareness & Social Responsibility

  • A sense of global awareness and social responsibility;
  • Ability to make decisions and act in a socially responsible manner

Methods of Assessment

The Outcomes Assessment program relies on a number of different tools for measuring the effectiveness of the educational process, including the following:  

  • Departmental Self Study: Every five years, each academic department conducts a self-assessment using appropriate guidelines and develops a five-year strategic plan based on the assessment results and recommendations from external reviewers. Self-studies assess curriculum, faculty and available resources.
  • Writing Assessment Program: Commencing with the class of 2017 (fall semester 2013), all incoming students will be required to participate in a writing assessment program, which includes a writing placement test to evaluate the writing skills of all incoming first-year students, a sophomore writing proficiency examination (WPE), and the completion of a final junior writing proficiency portfolio. All students must pass the WPE and the portfolio assessment as part of the graduation requirement.
  • United States Coast Guard License Examination: This is a standardized examination administered by the United States Coast Guard to the two maritime majors. Marine Transportation students are examined in Rules of the Road, General Deck Questions, General Navigation Questions, Safety, and Navigational Problems. Marine Engineering students are examined in General Subjects, Electricity, Steam Plants, Motor Plants and Auxiliary Boilers, and Engineering Safety.
  • STCW–Standards for Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers Quality Standards System: The International Maritime Organization requires all training and assessment to be “continuously monitored through a quality standards system to ensure achievement of defined objectives.” Each student must meet qualifications in both academic coursework and practical training areas. Courses in Marine Transportation and Marine Engineering have been designed such that the defined standards are embedded throughout the course and assessed through written and oral projects, examinations, and practical performance. All students participating in STCW courses are held to the same standards, regardless of major. 
  • FEQE—Facilities Engineering Qualification Examination: The FEQE is required of all Facilities Engineering majors in order to graduate. The examination was developed by the Engineering department to serve as the primary assessment tool for the major and is comprised of two sections. Section One includes required assessment in auxiliary machinery, commercial boilers and conversions, and mathematics. The remaining assessment areas are chosen by the students from a variety of subjects in the field. Section Two of the examination is based on English composition. 
  • Marine Engineering Qualification Program: All Marine Engineering students participate in the Marine Engineering Qualification Program. The purpose of the program is to insure that each student in the Marine Engineering Program attains an increasing level of shipboard engineering expertise each year while at the Academy, can operate the training ship machinery efficiently and safely, and can demonstrate a satisfactory level of basic engineering knowledge prior to graduation. 
  • ETS Proficiency Profile: Administered by ETS, provided entrance and exit benchmarking for general education subjects.

Sophomore Writing Proficiency Exam (WPE)

All eligible students with Sophomore status will retake the Writeplacer Plus® exam fourth semester, and MMA writing faculty will evaluate these written responses based upon a rubric designed to reflect national college-level writing standards. Students will be assessed as either passing or failing this exam, and failing students will receive faculty feedback on their writing strengths and weaknesses. Failing students will be given the option to retake the exam before the end of the semester. Students who fail the second attempt, or who do not retake the exam, will be required to take  writing intensive course, HU-6062 Writing in Style, a Humanities Group II elective, prior to further testing. To be eligible for the WPE, a student must have Sophomore status and have passed English Composition (or its equivalent) with a C- or above, and passed Analysis and Interpretation of Literature. 

Junior ePortfolio Assessment

All students who have passed the Sophomore WPE will receive a final writing assessment before graduation based upon written artifacts submitted as an ePortfolio in Taskstream. Students are required to submit a minimum of 3500 words (8 pages) and a maximum of 7000 words (16 pages) per portfolio for assessment, broken down as follows: 

  • An approximately 1,000 – 2,000 word paper from HU-1111, English Composition and/or HU- 1222, Analysis and Interpretation of Literature.
  • An essay or report from any other course taken at MMA, preferably from a course in the student’s major.
  • Introduction to Commercial Shipping Project for MT and ME majors; Introduction to Co-op Project for all other majors.
  • A 500-1,000 word cover letter for the Portfolio describing the audience and the purpose for the assignments, and reflecting upon the writing process and the strengths of the final portfolio.

Portfolios will be assessed by two writing faculty using the Writing Assessment Program rubric. Evaluation will fall into the following categories:

  • Pass with Distinction: work represents the top 10% of junior-level writers
  • Pass: work shows proficiency in writing suitable for upper-division work and graduation
  • Needs Work: demonstrates a need for additional, structured writing assistance 

The writing portfolio must be assessed as either ‘Pass with Distinction’ or ‘Pass’ in order for the student to graduate.

Portfolios in the “Needs Work” Category

Students whose writing portfolio is deemed “Needs Work” will be provided with a recommendation for additional coursework or with strategies for improving their portfolio submission. Upon completion of the recommendation, the student will resubmit the writing portfolio. Students who do not pass the final portfolio assessment will have the right to appeal the decision. The appeal must be in writing, submitted to the Humanities Department chair within seven days of notification of failure, and must point to specific evidence from the portfolio in support of the student’s argument. Portfolios under appeal will be re-evaluated. 

CQPA

The following minimum standards are established for Cumulative Quality Point Averages (CQPA):

  Retention Good Standing
Class Fall Semester Spring Semester Fall Semester Spring Semester
Freshman 1.0 1.5 1.5 1.8
Sophomore 1.5 1.8 1.8 2.0
Junior 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0
Senior 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

Academic Evaluation

Faculty have several tools in addition to end of the semester grading to measure a student’s progress towards successful completion of a course.  A member of the faculty may opt to use the “Academic Alert System” and/or “Mid-Term Deficiencies” as a means of sharing with the student that the student is not performing to a level necessary to pass the course.  When a faculty member uses either of these tools, the information is disseminated to the student and to his or her faculty academic advisor. 

Academic Board

The Academic Board reviews the academic status and potential of those students subject to dismissal from the Academy.  The Board is empowered to recommend mitigation of a student’s academic dismissal to suspension, or probation.

The Academic Board is composed of the department chairpersons; the Registrar and the Vice-President/Academic Dean.  The deliberations of the Academic Board are conducted in accordance with procedural rules adopted on its motion.  Recommendations are submitted to the President for consideration and final disposition.

Students who fail to meet the standards for retention may be dismissed from the Academy at the discretion of the Academic Board.

Academic Dismissal

Academic dismissal constitutes the removal of a student from the Academy because he or she was unable to achieve minimum academic standards.

Students who are academically dismissed from the Academy may not take courses through the Academy’s standard “day” program or through its Division of Graduate and Continuing Education. An academically dismissed student may apply for readmission to the Academy only after having completed at least twelve (12) credits approved by Massachusetts Maritime Academy at other accredited institutions and achieving a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 at those institutions.

Any student falling in one or more of the following categories will be subject to dismissal from the Academy:

  • having failed to meet the minimum standards established for retention;
  • having failed three or more courses;
  • having been unable to achieve academic good standing after being on probation for two consecutive semesters;
  • having failed to advance to the next level of academic standing after three or more semesters

Academic Suspension

Academic suspension constitutes temporary removal from the college for academic deficiencies that must be rectified before readmission, as identified by the Academic Review Board. The conditions of suspension include a written notification to the student of the course(s) that must be successfully completed either at MMA, as a non-matriculated student, or at another accredited institution of higher learning before he or she can be considered for readmission to the college. The Academic Dean will determine the grade and/or grade point average the student must achieve to be considered for readmission to MMA. Suspension will automatically result when a student fails to complete SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry by the end of the second semester at the Academy.

In order to be considered for readmission, subject to the Academic Dean’s approval, a student who fails to complete SM-1111 Algebra and Trigonometry by the end of the second academic semester may

  • re-take the course at MMA, as a non-matriculated student, and earn a passing grade (D- or better), or
  • Take a similar, pre-approved course at another accredited institution of higher learning and earn a grade of “C” or better. 

Academic Probation

Probationary status is a warning to a student that he or she is no longer in academic good standing and is in jeopardy of falling below those standards established for retention or graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to increase his or her academic efforts in order to regain academic good standing.

Probation will automatically result when

  • CQPA falls below those numbers established for good academic standing;
  • an accumulation of course failures has occurred to the extent that graduation will not be possible;
  • a student is readmitted following academic suspension or dismissal.

A student will be removed from academic probation by

  • raising his or her CQPA to the level necessary to be in good academic standing;
  • repeating and obtaining a passing grade in a course necessary to be in compliance with graduation requirements.

A student cannot remain on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters without being subject to dismissal from the Academy.  

Course Failures

A student must receive a passing grade (D- or better) to receive credit for a course. A student who fails a course has three options:

  • Repeat the failed course on campus. The repeated course grade and credit hours (see “Forgiveness of One” Policy) will be used in calculating the term quality point average of the term in which the course is repeated. The CQPA will include the repeated grade and credit hours only;
  • Retain the failed grade without repeating the course if his or her CQPA and total course completions are sufficient for graduation. Note: This option does not apply in the case of required courses;
  • Repeat the failed course, or equivalent, at another accredited institution. A grade of ‘C’ (2.0) or better will be required for the course to be deemed successfully completed. Transfer grades will not be used in computing the CQPA (see Section on Transfer Credits).

Repeated Courses

A student may repeat a course previously passed (but never failed) once within one year of the original grade. The repeated course grade and credit hours will be used in calculating the term GPA of the term in which the course is repeated. The CQPA will be computed using the higher of the two grades and credit hours.

“Forgiveness of One” Policy

This policy, implemented in the fall of 2012, allows a student to replace a failed or lower grade in the CQPA with a higher grade only by achieving a higher grade on the next attempt. If a student fails a course twice and passes it on the third attempt, then one of the two failed graded will impact the student’s CQPA. If a student were to fail a course on multiple attempts, all but the first failure would impact the CQPA. 

Progress Toward a Degree

A student is deemed to be making acceptable progress toward a degree if the student maintains Good Academic Standing and retains the same Academic Year Designation for no more than three academic semesters. 

Students who are not making acceptable progress toward a degree will be reviewed by the Academic Board.

A student must complete all degree requirements, including license programs, within ten years from the original date of enrollment. All courses, taken either at MMA or at another accredited institution, will have a ten-year time limitation except where Coast Guard regulations otherwise require. Exemptions to the ten-year limit may be considered on an individual basis when recommended by the Academic Dean and the President of MMA. Factors that may result in a waiver might include time spent on humanitarian efforts or military service. 

Academic Review Board.

A student must complete all degree requirements, including license programs, within ten years from the original date of enrollment.  All courses, taken either at MMA or at another accredited institution, will have a ten-year time limitation except where Coast Guard regulations otherwise require.  Exemptions to the ten-year limit may be considered on an individual basis when recommended by the Academic Dean and the President of MMA.  Factors that may result in a waiver might include time spent on humanitarian efforts or military service. 

Engineering Department STCW Grading Policy

Existing STCW policy requires a passing grade of 70 or higher for any required STCW course. An STCW grade below 70 results in the requirement to repeat the applicable STCW course. To establish a clear Engineering Department policy and to make clear student expectations, the Engineering Department has established a no “D” grading policy for any STCW course taught by the Engineering Department. Therefore, the Engineering Department STCW course grading policy is: A, A-, B+, B, B- , C+, C, C-, and F. The following required STCW courses are taught by the Engineering Department and fall under this policy:

  • EN-1112 Engineering Systems and Safety
  • EN-1211 Auxiliary Machinery I
  • EN-1222 Auxiliary Machinery I for Facilities
  • EN-2111 Auxiliary Machinery II
  • EN-2121 Auxiliary Machinery II for Facilities
  • EN-2112 Machine Tool Technology
  • EN-2231 Sea Term II – Engine
  • EN-2232 Internal Combustion Engines I
  • EN-3111 Electrical Machines
  • EN-3111L Electrical Machines Lab
  • EN-3131 Steam Generators
  • EN-3212 Electronics
  • EN-3213 Refrigeration
  • EN-3216 Operational Controls
  • EN-3233 Steam and Gas Turbines
  • EN-4112 Thermodynamics/Fluids Lab
  • EN-4131 Internal Combustion Engines II
  • EN-4151 Applied Naval Architecture for Marine Engineers
  • EN-4231 Sea Term IV – Engine
  • EN-4234 Engine Room Resource Management

Academic Set Back

Academic set back may be granted by the Academic Board when it believes that a student otherwise subject to academic dismissal may benefit by repeating an academic semester at the Academy. A set back student will retake at least three courses for which he/she previously received grades of D+ or lower. Grades earned will replace the previous grades in the calculation of the QPA. The student remains on academic probation during the set back semester and must either bring his/her CQPA up to retention standards at the end of the semester or be dismissed from the Academy. Students who accept set back will thereafter wear the name tag color of the following year’s class.

Eligibility: A student must have sophomore status or higher as defined by the academic standards to be eligible for academic set back, and a student is allowed only one set-back while at the Academy.

Restrictions: A student on academic set back:

  1. must retake at least three courses;
  2. may not take more than one course not taken previously;
  3. may not take more than 13 academic credits;
  4. may not hold any regimental or shipboard leadership position;
  5. may not participate in Academy sponsored clubs, extracurricular activities, or varsity athletic programs. 

Academic Year Designation

Students in a degree program have the academic year designation of freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior.

A student has the academic year designation of freshman until he or she has formally declared a major course of study and has earned the next academic year designation.

A sophomore has successfully completed at least one-fourth of the courses required for the degree program, including all but two required first-year courses, and has successfully completed a freshman sea term experience.

A junior has successfully completed at least one-half of the courses required for the degree program, including all required first-year courses and all but two required second-year courses, and has successfully completed any required second-level sea term or cooperative.

A senior has successfully completed at least three-quarters of the courses required for the degree program, including all required first-year and second-year courses and all but two required third-year courses, and has successfully completed any required third-year sea term or cooperative. 

Class Designation

Members of the Regiment of Cadets are designated 1/C, 2/C, 3/C, and 4/C depending on the number of years enrolled at the Academy. 

4/C status: Cadet Candidates receive recognition as 4/C cadets during the fall semester.  
4/C to 3/C status: Students must have successfully completed all but two freshman requirements and must have a 1.8 cumulative GPA.
3/C to 2/C status: Students must have successfully completed all freshman requirements, must have successfully completed all but two sophomore requirements, and must have a 2.0 cumulative GPA.
2/C to 1/C status: Students must have successfully completed all freshman and sophomore requirements; must have successfully completed all but two junior requirements, and must have a 2.0 cumulative GPA
4/C to 3/C status (transfer students): Students must meet all of the following requirements:

  • Complete Fall semester at MMA
  • Complete Sea Term I or Experiential Learning (if required by major)
  • Transfer credits + MMA credits + Winter requirement must total at least
  • 51 credits for Marine Transportation/Marine Engineers
  • 48 credits for Marine Safety & Environmental Protection/Emergency Management
  • 45 credits for International Maritime Business/Facilities Engineers/Energy System Engineers
  • Completed English Composition I
  • Completed Algebra/ Trigonometry
  • Completed Chemistry I
  • Have a minimum CGPA of 1.8

The registrar automatically reviews all 4/C transfer students for the possibility of bumping up during the winter term. No action is needed by the student. Transfer students’ class year designation is determined on an individual basis by the Vice President for Student Services based on the anticipated graduation date.

Academic Honesty

Massachusetts Maritime Academy expects all cadets and students to abide by its Honor Code which states: Cadets and Students do not lie, cheat or steal nor do they tolerate these acts from others.

The Cadet Regimental Manual clearly outlines the various actions that may be considered cheating. These include plagiarism, misrepresentation, and unauthorized notes, among other things.  Individual instructors may set the requirements for their courses as they wish, and students should make sure they understand these requirements.

Academic freedom has traditionally allowed instructors to deal with academic dishonesty in many ways, including (but not limited to) requiring the student to redo an assignment, assigning a grade of zero for the test or assignment, or failing the student for the course.  When the situation warrants, the instructor may also refer the matter to the Honor Board, which may recommend suspension or dismissal from the Academy for violations of the Honor Code.

Awards and Honors

At the end of each academic term, the grades awarded to full-time students are reviewed and, for students with no incompletes or grades below C-, academic proficiency noted as follows:

  • Dean’s List TQPA of 3.3 – 3.59
  • President’s List TQPA of 3.6 or higher

A cadet who appears on the Dean’s List or the President’s List is entitled to wear the appropriate ribbon on his or her uniform. All ribbons will be awarded by the Commandant of Cadets at the appropriate time.

Graduation

To be eligible for graduation and receive a Bachelor of Science degree a student must

  1. be recommended for the degree by the appropriate department in recognition of satisfactory completion of the minimum number of courses and credits as established in the degree curriculum;
  2. maintain a CQPA of 2.0 as well as a Quality Point Average (QPA) of 2.0 in the major;
  3. have not failed, without repeating successfully, any courses in the required curriculum. Only failures in courses not required to complete the degree requirements are allowed;
  4. maintain prescribed standards of conduct and aptitude;
  5. discharge all financial obligations to the Academy;
  6. successful completion of applicable U.S. Coast Guard license examinations prior to receiving a degree in Marine Engineering or Marine Transportation, as required by the Maritime Administration (MARAD). 

Academic excellence for the baccalaureate program is recognized by awarding degrees summa cum laude (CQPA of 3.8 or higher), magna cum laude (CQPA of 3.6 to 3.79), and cum laude (CQPA of 3.3 to 3.59). The CQPA determined for honors is based on all college-level work attempted at Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Students who received three or more “F” grades at MMA are not eligible for graduation honors.

The commencement booklet is printed prior to grades being submitted for the last term. Therefore, the Office of the Registrar must print the honors designation that a student has earned up to but not including his or her final semester. The student’s official degree transcript will reflect the appropriate honors designation. 

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