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Massachusetts Maritime Academy - TS Kennedy cadets devote time to Curaçao Admissions - TS Kennedy cadets devote time to Curaçao

Picture from the Curaçao Chronicle
The civilian vessel T.S. Kennedy of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy completed a successful three-day visit to Curaçao today.

In addition to experiencing the sights of Curaçao during their port visit, many of the cadets aboard the T.S. Kennedy also devoted some of their time to the local community. Some conducted a landscaping and clean-up project at the Mgr. Verriet Foundation in Noord Zapateer on Saturday morning, while others enjoyed a friendly match with C.V.V. Willemstad on Saturday night.

Article Written and Published by Curaçao Chronicle
Mon, Jan 27th, 2014
Click here to see the article on the Curaçao Chronicle website!


Before reaching Curaçao, the T.S. Kennedy stopped in Haiti. Below is what Captain Bushy had to say in the Follow The Voyage Captain's Log:

Wednesday 22 January 2014 - We arrived at Ile a Vache, Haiti yesterday morning.  The wind was light from the east, but the sea’s swell was predominantly westerly, and confused.  Our shore contact dispatched the lighters to begin the transfer of humanitarian cargo, but soon discovered that the sea conditions were prohibitive for cargo operations. This morning it remained warm and humid, but clear.  The wind was slight, but we still had a swell running. Professor Lennon and his team ashore, working with local and national authorities, arranged for a lightering barge to come out to our anchorage.  We thought the operations could be conducted – not without some risk to personnel and equipment.  These risks are always present, but a carefully planned evolution, with skilled crew on the cargo gear can minimize them.

So, the job is now done. We swung out over 40 pallets of cargo – boxes of household supplies, tubs of clothing and shoes, bicycles, office furniture – even a sawmill.  It took us just over three hours once we got started.  The operation was successful because of the skill of the deck department – especially the Bosun and AB – who directed the loading of cargo nets and the cargo gear.  We watched with faint amusement as three Haitian fellows were scrambling to find room in the lightering barge for all the materials.  But everyone remained safe – no injuries to our crew or the barge’s crew. And it did not look like there was any damage to any of the material we delivered.

The ship has weighed anchor now and we are finally on our way toward a port where the gangway will be lowered to the dock, and the cadets and crew can get ashore for some relaxation.  Curacao Friday morning!

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last updated 1-28-2014 by nsantos@maritime.edu